Forum home Wildlife gardening

Bunny Rabbit in Garden

A charming little bunny rabbit has arrived in our back garden.

Should I be worried?

(we live in a rural town, quarter acre, backing on to railway embankment and near to school playing feilds, common etc)

«1

Posts

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 69,317

    This is a wild rabbit?  If so shoo it out and tell it not to bring it's friends.  

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • plant pauperplant pauper Posts: 6,234

    Pet rabbits escape all the time. Generally they make their way back home but it might be worth checking to see if anyone has lost one. 

    I'm thinking it may be just a wee visitor from the railway. image

  • herbaceousherbaceous E. BerksPosts: 2,243

    Be afraid, be very afraid......... Especially if it called Peter, not so much with the Roger

    I grew up a short distance from a railway embankment, backing onto an orchard, in Surrey. I well remember the morning my Dad (usually a mild mannered, kindly man) found a forest of standardised brussel sprouts plants. Rabbit didn't even bother to go on tiptoes just went through at head height.

    I discovered quite a bit about my Dad that day, and expanded my vocabulary.

    If you don't grow veg maybe just enjoy.

    "The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."  Sir Terry Pratchett
  • I dont think its an escaped pet. Its a brown common wild rabbit i would say, quite juvenile looking (a baby).

    We dont grow any fruit and veg at all but will it eat my seedlings, flowers, young plants? I am already under seige from slugs.

    Will it start digging burrows in the lawn? Hopefully not as the lawn is flat and I think rabbits prefer an embankment dont they?

    I dont suppose there is much we can do about rabbits but i want to know whether to smile when i see one or get annoyed.

  • herbaceousherbaceous E. BerksPosts: 2,243

    Yes guildford it will eat your smaller plants, mostly they can't be bothered with anything that needs a stretch so stuff at nose level could be a target. Your lawn should be OK unless its like mine in which case clover, dandelion, some sorrel etc. They burrow in soft ground, sand usually hence the embankment which probably has a soft retained bank.

    As Dove says, the problem comes if they tell their friends.

    "The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."  Sir Terry Pratchett
  • It may not in fact be a baby rabbit - the adults are far smaller these days than they used to be.  Chances are that you'll soon see lots more and your garden will be damaged in several ways:-  they'll eat most plants, i.e. non poisonous ones, and wlll even stand on their hind legs to reach things.  I've often watched them do that! They dig holes for latrines and of course can burrow underground which causes problems too.

    My garden is in the corner of what was once a large field and over the past 20 or so years the rabbit population has grown enormously.  Since the demise of my last semi-feral cat (they used to keep the rabbits under control) the garden has suffered greatly and now I am unable to grow lots of things which I used to.  I now even have to put my containers for summer planting on top of piles of bricks or upturned large pots, just to keep things out of reach.  As an example, last year I planted a lot of pots with violas in early spring, and the pots were arranged in a curve with the smallest at one end and the largest at the other.  I went away for a week and came back to find the pansies totally devoured!  The rabbits must have jumped from the smaller to the larger pots to achieve that!

    They don't, however, eat foxgloves, euphorbias, pelargoniums, hellebores, mahonias etc - to name a few,  so those have remained untouched.  I've found that the young rabbits will even nibble young plants which are said to be "rabbit proof"- perhaps they give it a try and decide they don't like the taste!

  • CeresCeres Posts: 2,102

    It might just move on if you are very lucky. We had a baby bunny visiting the garden but it disappeared when it was at a size to cause trouble. Of course, it may have been eaten by something larger.

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 69,317
    Ceres says:

    .... Of course, it may have been eaten by something larger.

     I'm larger than a rabbit image

    http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/international/european/british/old-english-rabbit-pie 

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • CeresCeres Posts: 2,102

    I've never been able to eat bunny since my Mother left the vertebrae in a stew right after I'd been drawing the same part of the rabbit in a biology lesson. I don't eat my models.

  • herbaceousherbaceous E. BerksPosts: 2,243

    Many moons ago I did Zoology at 'A' level,  still can't eat rabbit or rock salmon!

    "The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."  Sir Terry Pratchett
Sign In or Register to comment.