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What will deer leave alone, hopefully

I will be doing 2 new beds at the front of my garden which is east facing. I live in a bungalow so it gets a fair amount of sunshine. However the neighbours tell me that deer wander down the road at night and do eat certain plants. I will pick my neighbours brains for ideas but wondered if anybody had any ideas. I am a novice gardener so do not want anything too complicated but do like time spent pottering in the garden. I would like a main shrub in each of the beds. Azaleas seem to do quite well and seem to be left alone. Any ideas gratefully received image

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  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,036

    The RHS has a list of plants they reckon to be resistant, if not completely deer-proof:-

    https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=185 

    You can check the care and cultivation needs of each one to decide if it will be suitable for your situation - sun, soil, rainfall, exposure to wind and frost etc...

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • chickychicky SurreyPosts: 10,206

    We are plagued by deer, and over the years have found quite a few things are left alone - made this list for someone else recently - hope it helps

    Plants our deer don't eat

    Spring bulbs

    Snowdrops
    Daffodils
    Hellebores
    Primroses
    Scilla
    Chinodoxa
    Alliums

    Summer Annuals

    Petunias
    Isotoma
    Salvia
    Diascia
    Lobelia (they sometimes have a nibble, but don't come back for more)
    Rudbeckias (the half hardy ones with fuzzy leaves ...they do eat the perennials like Goldstrum)
    Zinnias

    Perennials

    Peonies
    Oriental poppies
    Lavender
    Aquilegias
    Echinops
    Euphorbia
    Lupins
    Centaurea montana
    Agapanthus
    Nerines
    Lithodora
    Aubretia
    Sempervirums
    Sage
    Oregano
    Rosemary
    Cyclamen (the hardy ones, not the fancy ones sold as winter bedding)
    Ferns
    Hostas (although they eat the flower spikes they leave the leaves alone)
    Heathers
    Grasses


    Shrubs

    Daphne
    Most viburnums
    Hydrangea macrophyllia ( not the paniculata ones)
    Box
    Pieris
    Buddleja
    Rhodedendrons and deciduous azaleas (not evergreen azaleas)
    Magnolia stellata
    Wisteria
    Cotoneaster
    Pyracantha

    The world is a book, and those who do not travel read only one page  - St Augustine
  • Thanks for that, never thought to check there. I live in Dorset so weather is quite good most of the time, saying that thunderstorms predicted this afternoon. Looking forward to many hours wandering around garden centres , dont think my husband is but his favourite phrase at the moment is "how much ! "

  • Thanks chicky, was posting my earlier reply before i saw your post.

  • steephillsteephill Posts: 2,474

    Which species of deer? Muntjac will eat more things than roe, little sods scoffed my tulips and crocus this year which the roe deer had left alone.

  • star gaze lilystar gaze lily Posts: 16,762

    Ooh thanks for the list Chicky, we keep getting them in our garden lately.  They munched our rose bushes and also two young black lace shrubs. The latter now look like they've had it! 

    They may look like pretty bambi but I don't want them in my garden!!!image

  • No idea what sort of deer they are , have not seen them. Heard a noise last night , looked out but nothing , maybe next time. So looking forward to doing my garden so trying to plan the plants so they will be left alone. Thanks for all the advice , much appreciated.

  • star gaze lilystar gaze lily Posts: 16,762

    Steephill, how do you tell what type they are? image

  • chickychicky SurreyPosts: 10,206

    Muntjacs are quite small Lily - about the size of a dog or a fox .....and if you get a close enough look at them they have funny fangs that hang out the side of their mouth.  We have mostly roe, with a very occasional sighting of a little fella

    The world is a book, and those who do not travel read only one page  - St Augustine
  • RedwingRedwing SussexPosts: 1,228
    star gaze lily says:

    Steephill, how do you tell what type they are? image

    See original post

     lots of id features on all.  Googleimages is good for pictures.  Look up Fallow (there are three forms: dark brown, spotty and pale), Roe, Munkjack and Red.

    Based in Sussex, I garden to encourage as many birds to my garden as possible.
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