New large shed needed - help and advice much appreciated!

Hello again everyone

We have two metal sheds in our back garden that the previous owners put up. We cant stands the things! They are noisy, leaky, full of condensation, and the larger of the two is very warped and the doors fall off…. all.the.time.

So we'd like to replace the large one with a wooden shed, and probably just loose the smaller one and create a nice decked space eventually with planters etc. They are both situated on concreted slabs, with the walls sitting on a perimeter of bricks (which I assume we'll need to knock down to bring the concrete level. 

But we are new to sheds! The large one is big, I just measured it vaguely to get an idea  (not easy to be exact with a 7 month old trying to bang on the thing) - and it is just over 9ft by just over 12ft. 

We are firm believers in not skimping with this stuff - but we also don't want to pay over the odds. I think we'd prefer a roof window rather than anything on the sides for security reasons - unless someone can suggest a way to make a normal window work? There is a cable sending electricity to the shed. 

We don't have much (yet) to put in. A ladder, mower, some tools, a medium BBQ, the outside table and chairs in the winter months (they fold up). I also like my potting and growing so would like room for shelves for all that stuff!

What kind of price range would get us something substantial, to fit the bill? Is it best to try and find a place that supplies them built with shelves etc? Is roofing felt ok or are the alternatives worth springing for? 

Sorry if all of this is a bit mediocre/silly to ask!

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Posts

  • Bushman2Bushman2 Posts: 548

    Why not make the large one a log cabin style for the family to use and the smaller one a more normal garden shed style for tools etc. There is a huge range and prices vary.

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    Something like this would be £2000 ish but as i say the choice is huge.

  • KT53KT53 Posts: 3,449

    Just a guide to prices, but I got a 10' x 8' shed installed 3 years ago.  It is well made, sides of 3/4" t&g tanalised timber, double doors, window in one side, t&g flooring etc cost £1600.  I could have got one for less but the quality shone out when doing comparisons.

    Why the concern about windows?  If somebody is determined to get in they are far more likely just to wrench the doors open than try to break in through a window.  Decent light from a window also makes the shed much more usable.

  • ButtercupdaysButtercupdays Posts: 2,588

    That garden has potential! Lovely wall on the left and room for a big border that side of the pathimage

    Sheds thse days don't have to be hidden in dark corners, they can be painted pretty colours and dressed up to make attractive garden features.

    If you like potting and growing, then choose a shed with good light so it can function as a potting shed. It also means there is every possibility that you might  want a greenhouse in future, so think about that now, when deciding where put things, to save yourself difficulties later. It is not too hard to find temporary uses for a concrete base and could save you time and money in a few years when the time comes.

  • plant pauperplant pauper Posts: 6,236

    And roof windows leak....said the voice of experience. 

    My shed was here when I moved in and has a panel of wrinkly plastic in the roof. It doesn't leak because it's overlapped with the wrinkly other stuff. To be honest, with most sheds, a swift kick and you're in. 

  • Thank you everyone! 

    Bushman - we're actually in the process of having a conservatory constructed, so thats going to be our outside room. My childhood home had a log cabin and it just wasn't really used. I also want to try and sneak my husband's rowing machine into the new shed and out of our guest room ;)

    KT53 - Thanks for the guide, that seems to tally with what I've been finding. Our nearest major stockists are 'Skinners Sheds' and they seem to be good quality. Haven't been to any of their show areas properly yet though.The window issue is mainly because I had the thought that if they can see the contents, potential burglars might be more likely to attempt to break in? Having said that, no one has gotten into next door's exercise studio outbuilding yet. Maybe a blind or something will do? 

    Buttercupdays - I'm dying to do loads in it! I did extend the flower bed on the right side slightly last year. But baby arrival has put paid to much gardening this year! I was worried the wall on the left made that edge too shaded, but I think its actually fine. Anything is better than the moss lawn we get along that edge right now! I think I'd like some more hydrangeas and also a couple of climbing roses (I bought a lovely blue hydrangea the other day before realising we probably have quite alkaline soil, so going to have to pot that one!). I am definitely planning to paint the shed, as well as the fences. Funny you say about the greenhouse, behind the large shed theres actually more concrete for about 9 feet until you reach the rear wall. Perfect spot for a greenhouse! 

    plant pauper - I didn't realise modern roof windows would be leaky! damn. The local stockist has an option to add a roof vent-y type one but maybe I'll rethink that now!

    Again, thank you all, lots of food for thought!

    Last edited: 23 May 2016 17:38:39

  • BluebaronBluebaron Posts: 226

     Firstly I would put your old sheds on eBay you should get a pretty penny for them. With the added advantage  that you don't have to dismantle and dispose of them.

    Next you really have two choices,to buy kit and build it yourself or buy the timber and do it yourself. Doing the latter may cost you a similar amount but you would get a much better quality shed but obviously you need a competent DIYer to help you do that.

  • Bluebaron says:

     Firstly I would put your old sheds on eBay you should get a pretty penny for them. With the added advantage  that you don't have to dismantle and dispose of them.

    Next you really have two choices,to buy kit and build it yourself or buy the timber and do it yourself. Doing the latter may cost you a similar amount but you would get a much better quality shed but obviously you need a competent DIYer to help you do that.

    See original post

     Great tip on eBay! I hope the warped doors won't be too much of a disadvantage (a bit of hammering should fix them I guess)

    I think its going to have to be a case of buying a kit. Would love to do the latter route but unfortunately we just don't have the time. Husband works 8 until 7pm+ for five or six days a week. And I'll possibly be going back to a 40 hour week soon, too. 

  • polyhivepolyhive Posts: 8

    If you use other search engines than the usual big G then some rather interesting and cheaper results appear. We use one called duck duck go and it has turned up some interesting sites on the shed front so to speak.

    PH

  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 2,423

    I recommend http://www.easyshed.co.uk

    Not cheap, but you can specify the size you want in the proportions you want, position the windows and doors where you want, even have partitions, built in shelves etc etc AND they come and build it. The quality is brilliant too. 

    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
  • KT53KT53 Posts: 3,449

    I should have said, the price I mentioned was delivered and erected.  Good quality sheds are heavy and ideally should be erected professionally.

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