Low maintenance planning

granmagranma Posts: 1,817

Having  almost acre of land we are trying to plan for the future.

I have just spent a couple of weeks pulling out all the long grass etc at the moment it's controllable, but as we get older I know we won't be able to do this we have wide  flower beds , and borders , veg patch , scree bed . Lots of ornamental pots on a graval bed , an orchard 

I wondered if there is anything we can do for when we can no longer do the work ourselves .I worry it will end up being a jungle look. 

Would appreciate any ideas .image

Thanks in advance ,

Posts

  • Joyce21Joyce21 Posts: 15,061

    I have spent the last 5 years converting areas of high maintenance to what is now more manageable. As little bare earth as possible. . . packed in herbaceous plants and small shrubs, which don't require much pruning, got another outside tap and gathered most of the pots in one area to make watering easier. I now have only a few pots dedicated to spring/summer bedding, others have plants providing  leaf colour and texture all year. Some have perennial flowering plants. I add some trailing plants in the summer. I have 3 hanging baskets with heuchera and add summer trailing to them.

    Last edited: 22 May 2016 13:41:50

    SW Scotland
  • Rob LockwoodRob Lockwood Posts: 167

    Hi granma - I suppose it's about choosing easy-care plants, and, as Joyce says, putting in soil-covering plants which you prefer the look of compared to the weeds which will grow if there's bare soil.

    The big culprits for growing when/where I don't want them in my garden have been dandelions, green alkanet, foxgloves, forget-me-nots, honesty, herb robert and lesser celandine, so I've spent the last couple of years pulling these up and / or getting rid of them altogether - there aren't many left now.  There'll doubtless be other similar plants in your garden which seed everywhere and it'd be worth considerning whther they're more hassle than they're worth - foxgloves can be nice but I'm not sure worth the hassle in continually pulling up seedlings!  You might struggle to eradicate he grasses though...

    The other option I suppose is to make the ground un-growable(!) by putting down mulches of gravel / bark over weed-control fabric but this will drastically change the look of the garden (better than "jungle" though!)

    You might investigate equipment / technology to help - I know my electric scarifier and timer-controlled watering system saves a lot of work and energy.

    Good luck with it - a garden's to be enjoyed rather than stressful isn't it?!

  • LantanaLantana Posts: 5,733

    We had a largish garden in our last house with a weedy sparse lawn. Several years back we put down gravel which made a huge difference in time and effort looking after it. We've done the same here in this house we moved into last year even though the garden is very much smaller. 

    We're looking to the future when perhaps I might have to cope with it on my own and with a dodgy back there's no way I could manage mowing on a regular basis. Another thing I'm aware of is not to plant any rampant climbers which might require lots of high level pruning - or at least keep them under control from the start!

    You could think about having borders which aren't too wide. If you aren't able to lean right across them easily in the future narrower ones would be a great help.

    Evergreen shrubs so that the garden maintains a basic structure all year round plus, as Joyce says, pots grouped together to make watering easier. In our last place we had a timed watering system around the borders which was a godsend.

  • BobFlannigonBobFlannigon Posts: 611

    Could you not employ an occasional gardener to cut your grass and do odd bits of weeding?  Beyond that do what you enjoy.

    There's some value in having wild areas of your garden- either a wildflower meadow or just "see what grows".

  • plant pauperplant pauper Posts: 6,236

    My mum (80) had two flower beds that irritated the life out of her for years. She was always weeding and poking at them and they never repaid her hard work. Last year she had them turfed over by a keen gardener friend from round the corner who is always willing to help and advise. She still enjoys cutting her grass image and she says when she can't do that she'll know she's "had it"! She has someone who trims the hedges twice a year and she can sill fiddle about at little bits of annual planting and some beds at the back. Just do what you can and supervise the rest. People like to help.

  • granmagranma Posts: 1,817

    Thank you everyone who has taken the time to give good suggestions on my thread, it's true of everything you have ALL suggested .I will come back and let you know what steps I have taken ,probably take a little from each of you . Thanks again all you faithful friends x.

    Gran.

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