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Will my rose wake up?

wakeshinewakeshine Posts: 967

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I planted five roses in my front bedding area last week. Two of them seem to be in shock from replantation (photos 2 and 3). They have been like this for one week now. I am particularly worried about the bigger light green leafed one (second photo, a Portland rose, Rose de Rescht). The other one is a hybrid tea, Troika. With Rose de Rescht, all the compost fell away when planting and we also moved it three times because the person digging the hole would not let me position it beforehand so we had to keep digging new holes. I wonder if when we finally got it in, we didn't pack it tight enough. Also I had heard that you can't plant a rose where one has been before, and there were some dead and crappy roses there before. But I dipped the roots in that fungi stuff beforehand which is meant to negate that replant disorder thing.

All five roses were planted in spots where previous roses were so I don't think that's the reason because the other 3 are fine. All those leaves are pointing upwards, not drooping like these. I have not watered it excessively but do you think it will recover and go back to normal? Isn't one week a long time for it to be dropping like this?

A similar thing has happened to one of my dahlias which was growing fine in the pot and as soon as I put it into the ground it has flopped (photo 1). Is this going to die too? Thanks in advance for any ideas or opinions.

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  • Dave MorganDave Morgan Posts: 3,123

    Wakeshine if they're new roses they'll take a year to establish properly. They look fine to me too. Rose de rescht especially is slow to establish and rarely gets going until year 2-3. As Tetley has said, feed mulch and keep well watered in the first year.

  • B3B3 South East LondonPosts: 22,335

    I never expect my roses to do much above ground in the first year or two. I assume it's all going on underground. Yours look fine. Look after them and feed now and again and your patience will be rewarded

    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 79,384

    They all look very healthy to me.  The one with the 'drooping' leaves isn't drooping - it just has a slightly different way of holding its leaves - different varieties do this.  

    Enjoy image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • wakeshinewakeshine Posts: 967
    Dovefromabove says:

    They all look very healthy to me.  The one with the 'drooping' leaves isn't drooping - it just has a slightly different way of holding its leaves - different varieties do this.  

    Enjoy image

    See original post

     The this it was totally different in the pot and the leaves were not like this. Unfortunately I did not take a 'before' photo. So I feel it is not well or in shock. But I am reassured that you all say they are fine! I actually regret getting Rescht now because I don't know if it will look good mixed in with all the modern roses in that row.

  • B3B3 South East LondonPosts: 22,335

    If the leaves grow very quickly after rain and warm conditions, the growth will be lush and soft. It will firm up later.

    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • wakeshinewakeshine Posts: 967

    image

    Is the dahlia alright? I have taken a lot of trouble to grow it from a tuber and don't want it to die. Look at it in comparison to this other one I planted:

    image

    Look at these two roses in comparison:

    image

    Isn't my rose drooping in comparison? It's definitely different to how it was in the pot.

  • wakeshinewakeshine Posts: 967
    B3 says:

    I never expect my roses to do much above ground in the first year or two. I assume it's all going on underground. Yours look fine. Look after them and feed now and again and your patience will be rewarded

    See original post

    What sort of feed? The lady in the shop convinced my mum to buy this liquid feed which was really expensive. I said no, good old fashioned rose pellets will do but she insisted on buying it as she wants to try it. Someone in another rose specialist shop said the liquid feed will mainly help to produce more leaves and not flowers so don't use it. I have Miracle Grow which someone else said was brilliant for flowers. I've seen her garden and it's amazing and she used Miracle Grow on everything once a month. It was only £3.97 in B&M. Shall I stick to that and forget the liquid feed?

    Oh also - I did not put bone meal in when I planted these - does it matter? I have some but I forgot. Also it attracted a cat last time which was making a mess around the rose. I also did not use any manure because I didn't have any, but I did use organic soil which has some manure in it I think, and also mixed in John Innes 3. I really hope this rose wakes up :-(

  • MarlorenaMarlorena East AngliaPosts: 6,796

    Wakeshine,

    ...regarding your 'Rose de Rescht', yes it is drooping quite a bit due to transplant shock, which is often the case when people plant roses in May which have been recently potted...

    ...my advice would be a little different to those already given, in that it doesn't need food right now, just water.  If that was mine I would fill a watering can preferably with rain water if you have it, and pour over the roots once each day for about a fortnight... you should start to see it recover... I'm not sure I would bother feeding it at all this current season....old roses likes these are quite thrifty in any case.. I would be more concerned about the replanting in a bed where other roses have grown for some time.  Although I favour the use of the M.Fungi, and it does help considerably, I still prefer to do some soil changing as well...

    ...here is a photo of 'Rose de Rescht' I took last August, so you can see it's a good repeat bloomer, with slightly drooping leafage...

    image

  • wakeshinewakeshine Posts: 967

    imageThank you so much Marlolena. This is small rose too isn't it? Yours hasn't got many buds - how long have you had it? I was a bit dubious about this rose. The flower is beautiful though. I wish I had put it in my back garden but I don't want to move it again. I will take your advice. I do not have a rain water collector (is that what it's called?!!) though and no rain water at present. Should I flood it with loads and loads of water from a hose, or just a bit at a time? I don't want to drown it.

    This was the rose bed before I planted it. As you can see the roses I took out were not established. They were cheap £1 bare root roses and I decided to get some better quality ones. Also there was a dead one which I removed.

  • MarlorenaMarlorena East AngliaPosts: 6,796

    ..ok...that should be alright Wakeshine, I don't see too many problems there, it's a nice open site... also just use tap water. You can use your hose but in my experience, an amount equivalent to a full watering can will do, each day, regardless of any rain you get... for about 2 weeks or so until you see signs of picking up... right now, things can dry up pretty quick...and it's almost impossible to over water a rose at this time of year...

    ...the rose in the photo is not mine, I don't grow it, I took it in a rose field near me... so it's not getting the kind of cultivation we would normally give it... they prune them right down in Spring and lift in winter for selling.. I thought it looked quite good considering...

    ..enjoy your rose, it's one I should like to have.. oh and by the way, if you want to liquid feed when you see the rose growing again, liquid tomato fertilizer mixed in the watering can, will do fine...I use 'Tomorite'...it also helps with buds not opening properly [balling]... but most of my roses are established now and I don't use supplemental irrigation except on new plantings... other gardeners may differ...

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