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Houses with lots of land

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  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 16,585

    You have hit the lodestone here Lucid. We are all off in our own little worlds of fantasy now.image

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • ButtercupdaysButtercupdays Posts: 2,739

    Perhaps we should set up our own house swap arrangements on here.  I have to say that an urban or suburban break with shops, theatres and restaurants etc on hand  has its attraction when you live in rural isolation all year long, just as urban dwellers have the reverse dream. At least we would have a gardener there to help take care of the plants and might learn something of the reality behind our dreamsimage

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 60,339
    Buttercupdays wrote (see)

    Perhaps we should set up our own house swap arrangements on here.  I have to say that an urban or suburban break with shops, theatres and restaurants etc on hand  has its attraction when you live in rural isolation all year long, just as urban dwellers have the reverse dream. At least we would have a gardener there to help take care of the plants and might learn something of the reality behind our dreamsimage

    Think we have the best of both worlds now - a bus stop at the bottom of the road with an hourly service into the city for theatre, shops, restaurants etc.  The mobile library stops there too. 

    10 minutes gentle stroll to the village with a bank, supermarket, opticians, undertakers, church, chemist, hair salon and financial advisor, Laura Ashley, a gastro-pub and a village pub-cum-post office, an off licence, an Indian take away and a fish and chip shop - as my son says, 'What more do you need at your age mum?'. 

    Yet 100m away we have an SSSI of old chalk caves full of bats, and the other side of the hill we have a nature reserve of grazing marsh, river and oak woodland teeming with wildlife that spills over into our garden.  All that coupled with a warm modern easy to run home.

    I've been there and done that with the rural smallholding - it was wonderful. image Must say, this is pretty wonderful too image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 16,585
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • PalustrisPalustris Posts: 3,253

    May one interject a word of warning here?

    If you need to work full time to pay the mortgage on a property with a large garden then you do not have the time, normally, to do the work on the garden. Our young neighbours have discovered this and their half acre plot is rapidly going back to weed infested scrub, as they both work long hours to get enough money to live.

    We managed with our 1 acre garden purely and simply because I was retired and could work on it full time.

    Now we are both getting on and feeling less fit, this garden is beginning to be hard to maintain as well.

    Sorry to be a bit negative, but it is something which always strikes me when watching these Move to the Country programmes on TV. Especially with folks who have never owned a large garden before.

  • LucidLucid Posts: 334

    Thanks for all of the further posts and advice everyone - it's very much appreciated for both sides of the view. image

    We found a lovely example house online (although still out of our price range for now) and it had a 0.33 acre garden which looked huge so it does help to visualise. It certainly looked like plenty of space to have a nice garden area plus grow food. The larger land dream would be so that we could have some rescue donkeys. I think you're supposed to have a minimum of an acre of grazing land per pair of donkeys, plus an acre of hard standing land for when the weather is bad. Then stables and whatever else they need etc.

    We're currently getting excited with projects for our own house, and finishing the garden. We had some money aside to get our kitchen done at some point this year but we're going to tackle it ourselves. We've fitted a full bathroom before in our flat so we're hoping this'll be a better job, although a longer one. So if we really get in to it we may found ourselves not put off by complete renovation opportunities that might come up.

    Lucid image

  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 16,585

    Whoa! as they say in donkey land.

    If cost is a consideration, i.e. you haven't won the pools yet, take into account the cost of keeping an animal fit and healthy. Vets bills are extraordinarily huge and just the normal day to day bills can be large. Here is what the Donkey Sanctuary reckons one donkey costs to keep.

    https://www.thedonkeysanctuary.org.uk/sites/sanctuary/files/document/142-1404405754-donkey_health_and_welfare_4.pdf



    Add to that any out of the blue disease or injury.

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • LucidLucid Posts: 334

    Thanks pansyface. Yes I think it is very much a dream rather than what we'll be able to do. But if we did have the money to buy such a place, and then had enough excess money each month (not likely I know) then we'd love to have some rescue donkeys. 

    Lucid image

  • PalustrisPalustris Posts: 3,253

    I think the worst part of having a dream like this is achieving it. I did and my plans used to give me something to mull over before going to sleep. Now I just lie there and worry about how we are going to keep the garden going. Hope you make your dream come true and live to enjoy it too!

    We have no regrets about doing what we did here, the last 20 years of making and maintaining a garden have been everything we imagined and more.

    If you can do it then do it.

  • Lou12Lou12 Posts: 1,149

    Very sensible advice Berghill, me and my husband have to work long hours and now I have a bad back and knees I am finding it hard to maintain my fairly small garden. It's a lot of work.

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