Leaves in pond!

Hi all

I put a pond in my garden last year and over the last few months have noticed quite a few leaves in there floating about (there isn't a tree overhead but there are a few nearby). I scooped some out today and also tried scooping some out from the bottom of the pond. Looks like there is a thick carpet of them at the bottom too. I also dredged up a couple of frogs and newts too (they were fine and hopped/crawled back into the water). Thing is, I am conscious of getting rid of as many leaves from the pond as I can as it turns the water bad - but I also don't want to disturb/scare off the amphibians that have made my pond their home. Should I continue to remove the leaves or just leave it? (no pun intended with my last line!)

Richard

Posts

  • CeresCeres Posts: 1,823

    A few leaves at the bottom of your pond will give the amphibians somewhere to hide, and not just the amphibians. There is a whole host of creatures that like to hunker down in the mud, which is what your leaves will eventually become. I've never noticed a deterioration in water quality due to leaves though there have been some alarming gaseous bubbles from the sludge when it is disturbed. I have a Hozelock pond grabber which makes the job of removing the excess vegetation very easy and you don't even have to get your hands wet.

  • treehugger80treehugger80 Posts: 1,879

    you should net a pond near trees in the autumn, it helps stop the leaves getting in the first place

  • CeresCeres Posts: 1,823

    But make sure you leave an arch for the newts and frogs to wander back and forth.

  • RJ BlandRJ Bland Posts: 7

    Thanks guys, much appreciated. Will look into netting in autumn and will probably just leave the leaves in there to decompose. I'm pretty sure one of the newts i dredged up was a great crested newt, so am keen that it continues to hang around!

  • RJ.......it's not always easy to net your pond particularly if you have tall marginal plants which are still standing when leaves begin to fall.

    A few minutes scooping up leaves from the surface is often all that is needed.  I'd agree with Ceres in that a new pond like yours will benefit from a bit of "stuff" in there to produce the much needed sludge for the wildlife over the next year or two ( depending on the size of your pond of course ! ) image 

  • RJ BlandRJ Bland Posts: 7

    Thanks for the advice, Philippa. The pond is not very big at all (only about a metre and a half long). I think I will remove the leaves that are visibly floating on top of the pond and leave the rest to mulch down. And yes, I do have a couple of tall marginal plants that might affect the netting. I'll deal with that at the end of summer image

  • Dave HumbyDave Humby Posts: 907

    RJ you could use bamboo canes in a type of wigwam configuration and wrap your netting around that in the autumn. The leaves would then roll down to the sides of the bond and not weigh down and settle on a 'flat' netting arrangement. 

  • RJ BlandRJ Bland Posts: 7

    Not a bad idea that!

  • Dave HumbyDave Humby Posts: 907

    And if you get the angles right with the appropriate length of cane you can keep the net from damaging your marginal plants. 

  • how about a picture of the pond?

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