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growing rhubarb

hi, I have a Timperley early rhubarb plant growing in an old recycling box.  Is it too late to try forcing it, or can I still have a go?  also, what alternatives are there to using a terracotta rhubarb forcer, as they seem really expensive?

 

thanks

Posts

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 22,156

    We use an old dustbin with a  brick on top to hold it down when windy.  Works a treat.  Very cheap and can be used for holding garden rubbish when sorting stuff for the compost heap the rest of the year.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Dave MorganDave Morgan Posts: 3,123

    I don't use rhubard forcers I use a very large plastic pot.

  • Invicta2Invicta2 Posts: 663

    My Timperley Early is already about a foot high without any forcing. Mind you I can't see it now as it is covered in snowimage.

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 22,156

    No idea what variety ours is but it started shooting in January which is way too early so we buried all the crowns in well rotted garden compost and have only just put our dustbins on 2 of them.    So far, the others are all staying firmly tucked up in their compost blankets.

    The point of forcing is not to make them grow faster but to get those tender pink stalks that are so juicy.   You need to have enough plants to let the forced ones rest for the rest of the season and not force them the next and so you can rotate the forcing pot/bucket/bins.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • MrsG2MrsG2 Posts: 2

    thanks for all your responses, I shall have a go!

  • Can you advice me, I have just bought a small potted early rhubarb plant which I intend to grow for a year or two before eating it.

    i have bought a black plastic dust bin to grow it in. I intend to drill holes in the bottom for drainage, and stand the bin on some bricks to allow water to run out,

    also put a few inches of rubble inside for drainage and stability.

    i will then fill with homegrown garden compost mixed with grit to at least half way up Before I plant my rhubarb inside.

    to any rhubarb growing people I would appreciate your reply and advice regarding anything you think I might have missed or can add to the plan.

    Thanks 

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 22,156

    They need a lot of water when growing so it would be better in the ground than in a bin if at all possible.  Other than that, if it must go in a pot, drill your holes a couple of inches above the base so there is a reservoir of water for when you forget to water it or when it's very hot and dry.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • hi Obleixx, thanks for your good advice I will follow it. 

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