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Clematis armandii

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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 33,290

    That's fair enough Redwing. image

     It might be worth making some big planters which can be raised off the ground, which will then allow drainage. I an see why you'd want to break that expanse up a bit. It might be worth trying specimen shrubs in large pots instead. A row of standard hollies or something similar, with pots in between which could be planted up with seasonal interest - bulbs for spring and annuals for summer etc.

    If you like sweet peas, you could do a few pots of those along the wall. They'd be more than happy in that aspect. image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • RedwingRedwing Posts: 875

    Yes Fairy.....I have been toying with the idea of multiple pots and considered holly too.  Multiple pots is probably what I will do but wanted to get something on the wall first.  I am open to any and all suggestions, the only proviso is that it goes with a Mediterranean style garden.

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 33,290

    How about three (or five) sections of trellis in a contrasting colour, and use a group 1 clematis (no pruning) in a pot to  grow up each trellis? Even when out of flower, the trellis will give a focal point and will break up the long stretch of wall. image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • RedwingRedwing Posts: 875

    Fairy: can you suggest three clematis's that will do well in pots?.....but I do want something evergreen......so difficult!

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 33,290

    aym - strelitzia isn't hardy.....

    I don't think you understand Redwing's situation. Montanas won't grow happily in pots.

    Redwing - if I was you , I'd contact Taylor's, or one of the other specialist Clematis growers, and ask them what they'd recommend. Richard Hodson often contributes here on the forum too, so he could probably offer you some excellent advice and make good suggestions. It's a very specific requirement you have.

    I have 'Constance' in a fairly limited corner space,  in a similar aspect to the one you have. I'm in central west Scotland, garden is quite exposed ( 400 feet above sea level) and I have no problem with hardiness. It's a Group 1 so no pruning needed, and she has lovely bell shaped flowers of deep, dusky pink in late winter/early spring. There are quite a few white varieties which would look smart against your dark background too. 

    http://i1331.photobucket.com/albums/w595/fairygirl55/DSCF0436_zpstqxnugzp.jpg

     

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 33,290

    Strelitzias are only reliably hardy in very sheltered, mild areas aym - and even then.....image 

    Not sure why you think I live in Surrey ...I'm several hundred miles further north and west. Unless i've misunderstood your post....

    I'm sure Redwing will make enquiries about what's suitable for her own conditions. As I said - her requirements are quite specific as plants can't go directly in the ground  image 

    Good luck with it Redwing. Perhaps worth taking a little time before deciding. It may take a bit of working out to get the best result. There are so many choices so it can be difficult!  image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,160

    How about an artwork of some sort, a big mural or something in metal? No problems with feeding and watering. image

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 33,290

    That crossed my mind too nut! Think Redwing wants real greenery though. Perhaps a mixture? image

    None of my clems are evergreen but there are some. I think you might have to compromise a little though Redwing image 

    I haven't mentioned ivy to give a backdrop of greenery, but , unlike some other climbers,  it actually does quite well in big containers. Some of the variegated ones are attractive. You can then use clematis in front or in between. It will all take quite a bit of maintaining with so many pots though. 

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,160

    Armandii is a bit iffy for me. Sometimes brilliant, wonderful flowering. Then another year a frost with catch it and there are dead bits way up in a tree and look naff all summer. The shed leaves are nearly as bad as laurel for obtrusive persistence. 

    I cut it off at the base last year but it's way up the tree again now

  • RedwingRedwing Posts: 875

    I'm so grateful for all these suggestion. I will look up those clematis varieties mentioned above.  I am not keen on trellis as I think the boarding quite attractive and will probably fix whatever I decide on with dark coloured wires.  

    What I am asking is very specific as Fairygirl points out.  The perpendicular brick wall, which is mostly out of sight of the picture, has a honeysuckle, clematis Montana and a Dorothy Perkins  rose growing on it already so I do have some nice summery things but I think maybe I could add a summer clematis to the barn wall too.  I like the look of 'Constance'; I think that would look nice against the black weatherboarding.  I will look it up.

     

     

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