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How to improve the Trowel?

Hello GW, 

I am currently an Industrial Designer designing and producing a new and improved gardening trowel.

Does anybody have any suggestions for:

+ Frustrating parts of current trowel designs (discomfort, cleaning etc.) ?

+ Anything you would love to see in a new trowel?

Do you see value in:

+ A deep dished blade that turns into a narrower blade that can be used similar to a fork to agitate and move anything from clay to composted garden beds?

Thanks very much image

I really appreciate your help!

Alexandra 

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Posts

  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 26,165

    IMHO it's cost so much to , basically, over-engineer such a product, it'd be easier and cheaper to use more than one tool. 

    I also think all that ability to turn from one thing to another is due to break down fairly quickly. 

    My garden trowel and fork are both decades old and in constant use.

    Devon.
  • Daryl2Daryl2 Posts: 452

    I think that the basic shape and design has been the same for hundreds of years all over the world because it works just fine the way it is image

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 63,867

    Strength of the bit where the blade and handle join, and a comfortable wooden handle are all I ask of a trowel image

     

    Edited to add:  and a nice leather thong for hanging it on the back of the shed door!

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 26,165

    I'd not want a knife which turns into a fork then a spoon. 

    " If it aint broke, don't try to mend it"

    Devon.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 63,867
    Hostafan1 wrote (see)

    I'd not want a knife which turns into a fork then a spoon. 

    " If it aint broke, don't try to mend it"

    I was just going to say that Hosta! image

    I think, if I really wanted to improve the trowel, I'd ask people for all their broken ones and then try to find out why they broke and make one that didn't.

    But then no one would buy any more 'cos they'd broken theirs .... image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 17,242

    I agree with all of the above.image

    I have acquired, through various house moves, quite a few left-behind trowels, I have inherited a couple and I've had a couple bought for me as presents. The one that I always go back to is made of plain steel (not stainless), has a wooden handle (plastic is too slippery) and has a longer, slightly goose-necked shaped "neck" between the trowel part and the handle. The trowel part is quite deep - I have seen similar shapes sold in builders' merchants.

    Hope that helps.

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 14,635

    I want one that doesn't bend where it is attached to the handle. Also a comfy non slip handle. Also a homing device so it doesnt get lost. Last year was a particularly bad year for trowels. One lost, one bent, one snapped. 

    You don't stop doing new things because you get old, you get old because you stop doing new things. <3
  • B3B3 Posts: 14,700

    I'm with verdun handle,and blade one piece.

    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 17,242

    I like a bit of insulation on a cold day. Wooden handles for frozen gardeners please.image

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
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