Bramley Seedling

I have a Bramley seedling but it has not produced very good results over the past two years There is one other old apple tree very close (I do not know the variety). Should I buy another type of apple tree for pollination?
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  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 16,149

    Bramley is a type of apple called a triploid. This means that it is self sterile, so its flowers won't pollinate each other. Not only that, it is a useless pollinator for other varieties. Not only that, but to get a really good crop you need two other varieties, not just one, to pollinate your Bramley.

    Another thing to take into account is that it produces quite a few of its fruits, but not all, at the ends of its branches. So if you have been pruning it in summer you may well have cut off some of your flower buds.

    Here is a list of apple trees which are known to be good pollinators of Bramley. As you have had some fruit in the past, rather than  no fruit at all, there must be suitable trees in the area. This can be up to two miles away. But by all means plant another tree. Why not?image

    http://www.keepers-nursery.co.uk/searchpolpartner.aspx?id=BRASEE

     

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • Bramley is a very poor pollinator it needs at least two other apple trees for decent pollinatio. Don't forget they must be different kinds of apples and blossom at the same time.

  • Pansy face you beat me to it.

  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 16,149

    Quick draw McGrawimage

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • Lynn DLynn D Posts: 32
    Thank you Pansyface and Chrissy the gardener. There is an old tree in my garden which has apples like a Worcester and there are neighbours' apple trees nearby. I planted the Bramley about 4 years ago but it has had a miserable couple of years! Perhaps I should use some sort of fertiliser?
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 16,149
    Four years is no time at all. Your tree is still just an infant. Bramleys, besides all their other irritating little foibles, are often prone to biennial bearing. That is when they produce a good crop one year and a poor one the next. Your tree may have tried to start this nonsense either last year or the year before, or perhaps it's just taking its time to settle in. There are some tricks you can play on a mature tree to try and break the biennial cycle but your tree is too young for that.



    If you have some home made compost, give it a good thick mulch in April. If it is growing in grass, cut a circle away equivalent to the size of the canopy. Apply some slow release fertiliser in the spring, if you like.



    Apple trees can live for hundreds of years so be patient.
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • Lynn DLynn D Posts: 32
    Thanks again! There is quite a lot I can do then. I have got a lot of unused compost I can use, I do get quite a bit of couch grass under the tree which is a real pain to get rid of and I will maybe use some bonemeal in Spring. Fingers crossed I will get more Bramleys this year!



    I wouldn't mind getting another tree but they all seem to be grafted on to dwarf rootstock. I would quite like to buy one that would grow bigger, I do have a fair size garden.
  • Lynn DLynn D Posts: 32
    The list on keepers nursery will be really useful too.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 16,149
    I have a couple of trees from Keepers. Well grown and well packed. They can give you just about any size tree you want. Bear in mind, the larger the rootstock the longer you will have to wait for fruit. image
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • Lynn DLynn D Posts: 32
    Oh really? I thought (mistakenly) if I bought another apple tree that was large I wouldn't have to wait so long! Ha ha, wrong again. Still, I might get one anyway. Will think about it.
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