Quick question about bird box

 

Hello, 

  I'm interested in  buying this bird box        http://www.livingwithbirds.com/nest-boxes-by-species/blue-tit/3sv/         I've rung them up but they've said starlings will nest in this box, Will blue tits / great tits / coal tits (along with other) nest in here or was the woman who I spoke to mistaken?    Thank you

Posts

  • treehugger80treehugger80 Posts: 1,877

    starlings will nest in the one with the bigger hole (45mm). The smaller hole (34mm) you will get blue and coal tits (starlings can't fit) and I can't see the point of the oval hole?

    Is there any reason why you need a bulletproof one? as its made of woodcrete. You can get much nicer ones made of wood that will last 10 years given the right treatment and will be a lot cheaper.

    or you could make your own for even cheaper?

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 56,539

    If you use a wooden one, it's a good idea to get one with a metal plate around the hole if you have woodpeckers or squirrels in the area as they will try to enlarge the hole to get at the eggs/chicks.  

    At least the woodcrete ones would give them toothache image

     

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • I have a lovely woodcrete one, benefits are an inability for bigger birds or squirrels to dig out the baby birds but also the insulating properties mean than theoretically the baby birds don't bake in the sunshine as they can in thinner boxes.

  •  

    I've chosen that box as I get a lot of (I know I'm not allowed to say it but......) cats in the garden, along with magpies and other common garden predators, Ive bought from this company many times and I'm delighted with their products, I should have specified the size, I'd be buying the 34mm, I'm sure there are prettier boxes but once it's installed I won't see it and besides, the sounds of baby birds and the sight of tits coming in and out would be better than the prettiest box.

  • Thanks Chris, Steven drags his mind out of the gutter long enough to post a comment.

     

    The BIgger Boy amd  I made bat box last weekend, this weekend it is going to be bird boxes if he is still interested (at 4 years old, and devastated that bats are loosing their homes), so a well timed thread.

     

    I like the idea of the metal lining to the entrance hole - does anyone know, will a face plate surrounding the hole be sufficient or will the whole hole have to be metal? I am thinking here that if the wood behind it rots / gets nibbled it could leave a sharp metal edge round the hole.

     

    As a side comment, I have a collection of pallets (no paint or treatment on them). You can pick up for free many places and are just about ideal. If you want to make them really cheap (pardon the use of cheap), a used bycycle inner tube makes a great hinge and waterproofs the lid / top a bit - 1 inner tube for a couple of ££ will do several boxes or 1 hinfge for the same amount

  • The BTO British Trust For Ornithology and the RSPB very much advise that you shouldn't treat nest boxes at all but if you insist then apply treatment in the autumn never in the spring. I wouldn't ever put up a new treated box in the spring.

    I understand that the warming up of the applied treatment (Fumes) poisons the birds especially the  young as they cannot escape from the box as nestlings whereas the adults can escape / leave the box for a breath of fresh air.

    The thicker the walls of the box are the better as insulation, a thinner box such as plywood heats up and cools down too quickly and the youngsters both freeze to death or cook in the box. The diameter of the hole determines the species that uses the box.

  • Just as an aside.  Your bird box ideally should face anyway bar south.  That is because just in case we get a proper summer the south facing will get the most sunshine on it and become too warm.  Dickie birds are pretty cool and prefer it that way.

  • Another bird box thing - next week (14 - 21 February 2016) is the RSPB national bird box week (Make homes for the birds and the bees next week)

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