Hawthorn Topiary

M FentM Fent Posts: 166
Has anyone on the forum ever tried to 'topiarise' Hawthorn? I read Arne Maynard writing about it but wondered if anyone had done it in real life and not at Chelsea et al.

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  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 13,917

    There is a famous hawthorn on the Mansfield to Nottingham road known as the table top tree. It has always been flat topped.

     

    You don't stop doing new things because you get old, you get old because you stop doing new things. <3
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 28,102

    I'd guess it's not a popular subject for topiary as it's deciduous. Perhaps that's the reason you rarely see it used. Slightly on a tangent - but I've seen Pyracantha  cloud pruned against a wall - it looks stunning. It comes down to one's imagination really image

    You could always start a trend M Fent image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • The ones round here are mostly wind pruned! They can still look artistic though.

  • M FentM Fent Posts: 166
    The Pyracanthus against a wall does look very good. I think Hawthorn would look good trained as a pyramid, especially in spring with its blossom and then in autumn with the bright red haws; ready decorated outdoor christmas tree anyone?



    Theres a thought: if you clip Hawthorn will it flower? And will it produce haws?



    On a different note I realise when ive already posted a question, the answer to most is very much give it a try becuase plants behave and adapt very differently to the one next door etc.



    Watch out Chelsea Flower Show, sales of Hawthorn is going to sky rocket!image
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 28,102

    Nothing ventured and all that MF image

    Do what makes you feel happy - that's the key to gardening. The only drawbacks are when you want to try something that your conditions won't allow. Trickier then!

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 13,917

    Hard clipping the hawthorn into  a shape is no different from a tight hedge. It responds well to hard clipping, but probably will not then flower and have haws.

    You don't stop doing new things because you get old, you get old because you stop doing new things. <3
  • M FentM Fent Posts: 166

    if it doesnt flower when clipped then not aloT

  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,088

    You might get a few flowers but mostly they'd be cut off.

    I'd keep the hawthorn free flowering for maximum wildlife support and topiarise something else.

    Go and find an old hawthorn hedge and see what it looks like when it's been tight clipped for yearsimage

     

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