Thyme and sedum - plant them out now?

Steve 309Steve 309 Posts: 2,753

My aged parent has this thyme and sedum in a small trough on her balcony.

image

 They've been in there all summer and, as you can see, are a bit straggly.  Is this a good time to plant them in a bed downstairs?   Trim them round the edges?

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  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,696

    I'd rather trim them back and put them somewhere a bit sheltered where they won't get the worst of the winter weather, then plant them out in gritty soil in the spring.

    If they're in the ground and get too soggy or get snow on them for a while they won't be happy.

     

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Steve 309Steve 309 Posts: 2,753

    OK - thanks - that's entirely inconclusive so far!  Any more votes? image

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 28,211

    If you've got really gritty soil and low rainfall, you could put them in the ground, they should be fine. If you get a lot of rain, and the ground's less than perfect, then I'd keep them potted. 

    Nothing like sitting on the fence Steve ....image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Steve 309Steve 309 Posts: 2,753

    It's London clay here, Fg, slightly improved with gravel and compost.  Looks like they're staying in their trough till the spring....

    Unless you know different......?

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 28,211

    Clay and lots of rain here Steve - so I generally keep them potted. Having said that, my raised beds house sedums with no problem, because I've 'made' the soil.  Mainly of grit and compost  image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Steve 309Steve 309 Posts: 2,753

    These two came in a multipack of six different plants for £2.99 from Lidl, so they don't owe us anything.  However, I shall keep them going if I can.

    Separate pots looks like the way forward; gritty compost presumably?  And then divide and plant out in spring, I think.

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,696

    Sounds good to me - yes gritty compost.  image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • I would take the whole lot out, put some fresh compost in the trough then take some cuttings and put them straight into the trough. Put the rest of the plants somewhere where they can spread - divide them up if you can. (Give to a friend or neighbour with some bare ground - clay is not a problem). The cuttings will take even in this season and then take off in the spring.  If some immediate colour is required, stick a couple of winter pansies or primulas  in till the trough starts to fill up. Sedums are so easy to propagate but a bit slower in the winter. They grow in all types of soil quite happily in my garden.

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