Forum home Plants

Beech hedging advise

Hi folks , just a few questions if you do not mind. I have purchased 150 bare root beech trees approx 4/5ft, Im looking to plant them next week in a double staggered row. I have turned the soil over so it is loose and will allow the roots space to develop. What distance should the two rows be apart? Also is it recommended to use bone meal or a root hormone? I don't want to be out too much money having purchased the plants but at the same time want to do it correctly. I understand you can use old manure too. Appriciate you advise folks and should I need to know anything else before planting. One more thing I was thinking of planting a few copper beech randomly throughout, would this look well or better sticking to all green? Thanks again
«1

Posts

  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 20,544

    There's a lot of good info here

    https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=377

     

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • Steve 309Steve 309 Posts: 2,753

    A shovelful of well-rotted manure or compost and a handful of bonemeal in each hole is a good idea.  Rooting hormone is entirely superfluous.  Spread out the roots, firm them in as you fill and water very well.

    As far as spacing is concerned I'd think two staggered rows with the plants a foot or so apart would be about right, but you'll need to work out the spacing along the rows to fit the distance you have to cover.

    Trim the tops off when they get to within a foot of the final height you want.

  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 16,156

    I would stick to one colour. My green beech hedge has one odd colour, not really copper but a red tinge to it. It looks odd. It also comes into leaf at a different time.

    You don't stop doing new things because you get old, you get old because you stop doing new things. <3
  • Steve 309Steve 309 Posts: 2,753

    Lots of good advice on that site Pansy image

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,145

    I'd have thought a foot apart is too close - especially with a double row. If you visit one of the specialist hedging suppliers' sites, they'll give you the recommended spacing. I think 15" to 18" apart will be the norm for beech. It gets very sturdy and fills out quite quickly. At that height, I'd take a good bit off the tops once planted too, although I know some people disagree with that.

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Steve 309Steve 309 Posts: 2,753

    Yes.  But if you say 'a foot and a half apart' it looks funny image

    I helped some friends plant a hornbeam hedge and the holes were a trowel and a half apart.

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,145

    What size was the trowel though Steve?....image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,045

    Remember to soak the roots in a bucket of water overnight before planting.  That way the stay hydrated and grow away faster.  Left dry they may just die.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Ritchie, this might not apply in your case, but when deciding the planting line do bear in mind the width of the finished hedge, so that it doesn't grow beyond your boundary and so you've got access to cut it. So many people plant their hedges a foot inside their boundary fence/wall and in no time they're growing out across pavements/public footpaths/neighbours' gardens.

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,045

    In Belgium there's a legal minimum planting distance from a boundary of 60cms for hedges and 2 metres for trees.   2m height maximum for a hedge.   Seems reasonable to me.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
Sign In or Register to comment.