Sad looking Ceonothus

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Hi everyone, I have this Ceonothus in my garden and it is looking very sad! Any ideas on a) what is wrong and b) what I should do? thank you very much in advance!

 

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Posts

  • nutcutletnutcutlet Posts: 24,255

    You could try cutting it right back and see what happens but I'd get rid of it. They're not long lived shrubs 

  • Mine have suffered the last 2 years, and I did pull up one last year as it had died altogether. However, I was loathe to lose both as the bees really love them, I kept it and pruned out the dead branches. I've been surrpised to see that it's growing new shoots from the main branches. It's reviving well and though not as floriferous this year at least the bees can still enjoy it. 

  • mandycmandyc Posts: 2

    My neighbour has a ceoanthus and it's been there for over 20 years.  She just leaves it  alone, never prunes it, never feeds it and has it planted in dry soil and hers is beautiful.  It helps that hers is in full sun all day whereas mine just gets sun part of the day and so mine takes longer to flower and doesn't flower as much.  But I've found that it's best not to prune it at all. 

     

  • Jan WrightJan Wright Posts: 21

    My Ceonothus went all brown due to the very long cold winter.  They need full sun (facing South) and are not really fully hardy.  I left it alone and eventually new leaves appeared.  So be patient and it will recover and eventually flower, fingers crossed!

  • WintersongWintersong Posts: 2,436

    Judging by the comments, my Ceanothus shouldn't be as tall as my house image or longed lived but its fifteen yrs old and flowers its socks off every year so we end up with a blue cloud in May.

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    Then again, I live in Kent and it faces due south against the house wall image

  • Abby2Abby2 Posts: 101

    I nearly lost mine last year after moving it at the wrong time. A dose of epsom salts brought it back practically from the dead! It's growing brilliantly this year even after this terrible weather.

  • I have often thought about planting a ceanothus hedge - it would look spectacular but for how long?  Thanks to the comments here, I'm pleased that I didn't!  With the odd exception, they do seem to be short lived, according to climate.  I bought one for my daughter & son in law 10 years ago for a wedding anniversary gift.  It never changed size or shape in all these years!  They have now divorced.  Hope it wasn't anything to do with the ceanothus!

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