Passiflora caerulea

Kai_63Kai_63 Posts: 81
I rather excitedly bought a Passiflora White Lightning today. I had read that it could get a little invasive but figured that at a max height of 4m, it couldn't be too bad.



I've been reading more about passiflora and it sounds like roots can turn up in all sorts of places, even patio cracks! Does anyone have any tips? I don't have lots of time to spend digging it up when it appears and would prefer just to leave it out of my garden if I am going to have lots of issues?



Thanks
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Posts

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,430

    I know it can be invasive in milder climates, but don't think it is a problem in the UK.  If you're concerned you could always grow it in a container https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=295

    image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • I had one for many years and it never spread,

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,430

    We had one on the front of a house three moves ago - it's still there and doesn't look as if it's spread down the street - unlike the Rambling Rector rose I planted in the back garden image

    My parents had one on the front of their seaside house for years and years - it covered the wall and the golden fruits looks great hanging there. It never got out of control image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Kai_63Kai_63 Posts: 81
    Great. I didn't know if 'milder climates' meant London which is where I am but sounds like they mean properly mild which isn't the UK! It will get decent partial rather than full sun so hopefully that will keep it in check a bit too (hope it is enough sun for it to flower well though)!
  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 2,529

    I had one growing up a fence (in London). It was pretty vigorous, but in a good way, and certainly wasn't invasive. Sadly it had to be cut down for the fence to be replaced in January and then moved for a new patio. I  thought I had saved it when the stump I had started sprouting, but it turned out I had saved something else entirely!

    So I was really sad to lose it... but I have since found 3 new plants several feet away from where the original was (including one in full, deep shade in a crack in some concrete!). So I'm delighted, but I suppose that means it does spread, a bit. I don't think any of them would be difficult to remove if I wanted to - I intend to move the other two but give the one in shade a chance to prove itself, given that nothing else will grow there.

    I had assumed these were self seeded from fallen fruits. I don't know if they sucker?

    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 23,624

    I've ripped mine out as it was invasive sending up suckers about 3m from the original plant.

    Still find the odd one shooting up from bits of root left in the ground.

    Devon.
  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 2,529

    Sounds like mine are suckers then, that's about the distance - interesting. This is the first time in the ten years I've been here that any have appeared though, I assume because of damage to the original plant.

    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 23,624

    one of mine was against a pergola and it smothered the rambling roses, so it had to go.

     

    Devon.
  • Kai_63Kai_63 Posts: 81
    So these are the stories that are ringing alarm bells. I don't mind a bit of work but equally having plants spring up far from where they are wanted will bother me (we have enough other weeds to deal with).



    Hostafan and Librarian's Garden, do you know what types you have?



    I was going to plant mine a metre or two away from a jasmine and clematis but it sounds like it will take over (in a narrow border between a wall and patio (with fence either side).



    I have a small raised bed (metre by half metre) with trellis that can be moved around, might grow it in that and keep it for a few years (it will outgrow it soon I imagine).



    Thanks
  • Like Hostafan I dug mine out.  It grew too quickly - covered the house wall - very beautiful - produced lovely apricot like fruits - flowered profusely and was much admired for 3 or 4 years.  It had to be removed ten years ago, after finding shoots coming up behiind the skirting boards of an iinternal wall in the house.  I am still pulling out seedlings as soon as I spot them from around where it was originally planted - long roots - and vast quantities, as they get going really rapidly once they see daylight.

    This is my ultimate no no plant - as bad if not worse than russian vine.

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