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This winter

Can anyone predict what this winter is going to be like. Predictions and observations with the aid of pine cones, berried fruits etc would be appreciated. Forwarned is forearmed. Thanks valerie
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  • CeresCeres Posts: 1,867

    Wet. Its always wet.

  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 17,520

    We are into the realms of fantasy now. The BBC forecasts are so inaccurate that I always go with the opposite of what they tell me and I'm right 50% of the time.image

    I always said that there was nobody more accurate than Bill Foggitt. His opinion was sought by Yorkshire television and he used seaweed.

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2004/sep/15/weather.climatechange

     

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • Hi pansy face, has anyone taken his place yet.
  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,160

    No, you can't predict.

    Someone will though, every year, and every year people forget how wrong the previous predictions have been. The met office gave up long range forecasts for that reason. Last year we were predicted a very bad winter. It was the first winter in my recollection that our area got no snow at all.

    How could berries on a plant predict what is going to happen? They tell us what has happened.

     

  • Just going by my grandad (1896 to 1986) nutcutlet, he used to say that if there were plenty of berries on the bushes it was to feed the birds and it was a sign of a bad long winter. I do agree it probably was because of a good spring, but you never know
  • WelshonionWelshonion Posts: 3,114
    Nutcutlet I was going to post the same thing. How does anybody think berries mean anything but what has gone before. The blossoms - and berries - have been phenomenal this year. The weather must have suited the plants last year.



    Even quite intelligent people say the British people voted for a Coalition Government in 2010. How?



    By the way, the winter is going to be hard. Well I hope so. Cold is better than continually wet.
  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,160
    valerieroberts wrote (see)
    Just going by my grandad (1896 to 1986) nutcutlet, he used to say that if there were plenty of berries on the bushes it was to feed the birds and it was a sign of a bad long winter. I do agree it probably was because of a good spring, but you never know
    Valerie, we do knowimage

     

  • Singing GardenerSinging Gardener EssexPosts: 1,073

    I predict that it will rain or snow when I have time to be in the garden and will be beautifully sunny when I have to be doing other things.

    According to the giant pine cones from my tree today is dry inside but wet outside and I can confirm that this is 100% correct. I was going to take some pictures to illustrate this but my camera battery says it's exhausted. I know how it feels!

  • WelshonionWelshonion Posts: 3,114
    Just remembered there were loads of berries on the trees last winter. In fact there were so many the migratory birds which rely on them had no need to come this far South as there were enough further North. The winter was mild and wet.



    For what it's worth, the weather this Summer will determine what the blossom and berries will be like next year. Look at hazel trees, for example, the tiny catkins were formed month's ago.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 22,258

    Too right.  Lots of berries simply indicates what kind of growing season the trees and shrubs have had.

    I've been googling about and it seems no-one in the weather world wants to stick their neck out yet.  Apart form anything else, in meteorological terms, we still have 2.5 months of autumn to go before winter starts on Dec 1st.   There's also the El Nino joker in the pack.

    One chap tho has done some statistical analysis and thinks cool wet Septembers lead to colder winters - http://www.theweatheroutlook.com/twoother/latest.aspx 

    The only thing to do really is wait ad see and be prepared with fences and structures repaired, fleece, coldframes and shelter ready for plants and hibernating critters and lots of bird food.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
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