Bluebells - White and Pink?

WodufinWodufin Posts: 18

Behind our garden we have a lovely little wooded area. Ealrier this year the floor was covered in snowdrops, which have now given away to a lovely carpet of bluebells.

They are lovely to look at, making for a lovely little secret glen. What I have noticed is that amongst the blue is the odd clump of white and pink 'blue'bells.

 

Is this a normal variation? I did'nt notice them this time last year, but as we'ed only just moved in, I didn't have my 'Garden' head on!

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Posts

  • BerghillBerghill Posts: 2,825

    Sorry, but that means they have been contaminated with the genes of the Spanish Bluebell. Native ones come in blue and never pink.

  • WodufinWodufin Posts: 18
     
    http://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m29/Fwapp/DSCF6789.jpg~original

     

    http://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m29/Fwapp/DSCF6787-2.jpg~original


     

     

    A couple of pictures

     

  • BerghillBerghill Posts: 2,825

    Spanish for sure, the blue ones as well. Sorry.

  • nightgardennightgarden Posts: 106

    They remind me of my grandmother's garden that was thick with pink white and blue bells. Spanish or not still very pretty so enjoy!

  • WodufinWodufin Posts: 18

    Shame they are Spanish but they are very pretty!

  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 11,221

    Thers a lot around here. Some white, some pink, some blue so strong they almost look like hyacinths. The great danes spent 2 years trampling them down, and still they come up. But they look good in areas that nothing else will grow in.   No real bluebell woods about, so no chance of contamination.

    It's not a mess, it's a nature reserve.
  • nutcutletnutcutlet Posts: 24,231

    I've got both here and I'm quite happy with the blue and white but keep pulling out the pink. I don't like it

  • rosemummyrosemummy Posts: 1,983

    got all 3,prefer blue but don't mind others,know spanish,would prefer english but inherited so...

  • Plants have inhabited the earth for many millions of years and have been hybridising all that time. It's a process you have no hope of stopping. We must stop fretting and accept that the lovely plants we all enjoy are unrecognisable from their forebears. 

    You might be able to marginally slow the process of bluebell hybridisation but you cannot stop it. Enjoy them for what they are.

     

  • nicolenicole Posts: 1

    I like the pink and white, didn't realise they were hybrids.  We have lots in our allotment, some Spanish and some native too.  The Spanish make very good cut flowers, they last longer in water than the natives.

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