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Tree ID & Care

DYLDYL Posts: 67

I believe after googling and checking images, I think this may be a 'Corkscrew Hazel'

Is this correct? And are the leaves supposed to be a little crinkly. The leaves look a little like it's in need of some TLC!

As you can see from the rear view, it's quite bare. This tree was completely swamped with things growing through it and behind it which have now been removed.

Do you recommend I do anything to it? I'm not sure if it's healthy or not.

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Posts

  • pansyfacepansyface Posts: 21,586

    The little that I know about corkscrew hazels tells me that that is a healthy one. As you say, it has been swamped in the past. I imagine if you leave it alone it will begin to bush out on the bald side.image

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
    If you live in Derbyshire, as I do.
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 9,985

    wish my hair would do the same image

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • pansyfacepansyface Posts: 21,586

    Me too and I am of the female persuasion.image

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
    If you live in Derbyshire, as I do.
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 33,769

    corylus avellana contorta , if you want the common name. It often sends up straight suckers from the rootstock, but yours hasn't. Give it time and , as pansyface says, it'll sprout back out on the other side, unlike your hair.image

    Devon.
  • DYLDYL Posts: 67

    It did have straight suckers running straight up, or branches. Not sure of the correct name image. I cut them off last week when I tidied things up. I actually thought they must have been another type of hazel growing around it!

    Are you supposed to cut the straight suckers back and if so should this be done at a certain time of year?

  • pansyfacepansyface Posts: 21,586

    "If you plant a Corylus avellana ‘Contorta’ in your garden, understand that it will be grafted to a Corylus rootstock which is NOT contorted and they are prone to suckering.  Watch out for shoots that grow straight up from the base of the plant and remove them as soon as possible.  If you don’t, the understock will eventually take over and you will lose your lovely twisty branches.  I don’t know how many times I’ve seen Corkscrew Hazel growing in gardens with a big tuft of straight branches shooting up from the bottom. I’m always tempted to whip out my pruners and fix the problem, but people don’t always take kindly to crazed gardeners brandishing sharp weapons on their private property!"

    From a website belonging to someone who obviously likes them a lot.image

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
    If you live in Derbyshire, as I do.
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