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Wilting laurels

I bought twelve root balled laurels approx 6 weeks ago to make a hedge.The soil around the root was so solid due to the cold weather ,I carefully removed the hard soil, planting the bare roots in good shrub compost. For a week the plants looked healthy,then one by one the leafs appear to be wilting with some brown patches on some of the leaves. How often should I water.It has been very cold,windy and dry in Scarborough so could this be the reason.Please advise on best course of action.

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  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,870

    Hi lotty. I wonder if you damaged those small roots that take up the water when you removed the hard soil. Was it hard because it was frozen or because it was dry? 6 weeks ago it was very cold and not an ideal planting time for an evergreen, the ground must have been very cold if not frozen. 

    If the soil/compost around them seems dry then water. It might be worth cutting them back a bit so there's not so much top growth to support.

  • lottyh40lottyh40 Posts: 26
    Hi nut cutlet because they were solid and dry.I have checked the soil it feels damp,there's small pebbles over the soil.Its rained in Scarborough today I was hoping that they would maybe perk up,wishful thinking !

    I will cut back slightly tomorrow do you think that things are still dormant with the poor weather.

    Regards
  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,870

    Plants may not be making much progress but they shouldn't be going backwards. The rain and moister atmosphere will be easier on them than the dry cold winds.

  • lottyh40lottyh40 Posts: 26
    Wilting Laurels

    Hi nut cutlet because they were solid and dry.I have checked the soil it feels damp,there's small pebbles over the soil.Its rained in Scarborough today I was hoping that they would maybe perk up,wishful thinking !

    I will cut back slightly tomorrow do you think that things are still dormant with the poor weather.

    Regards
  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,870

    Everything is late lotty. I'd reduce them a little, don't let them dry out, but don't drown them. If they're not taking up water they don't want to sit in it. Then just hope. 

     

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 82,269

    You may lose all the leaves that they have and they may look very sorry for themselves, but there's always the possibility that once their roots have got over the shock of being transplanted in what will have been unfavourable conditions, you may well find them leafing up again.  Plants won't grow properly until their roots are  doing their job.  Fingers very crossed image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • M FentM Fent Posts: 166

    Ive got the same problem them with mine Lotty! accpet mine are in a different scenario, i planted them last spring and they were doing brilliantly and thriving. However a few weeks ago when we had that bitter wind, they were getting battered so harshly image i did try to protect them with a fleece but it kept blowing off, now they have brown leaves all over and look very sorry for themselves. can anyone suggest a way of reviving them or will they sort themselves out? (Sorry lotty for posting a question on a question!! ) 

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