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Heating the greenhouse

What are the best ways to heat  a greenhouse?

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  • Tropical SamTropical Sam Posts: 1,488

    Using the sun is the best way but no use during winter. Having the greenhouse in full sun and dug about 1 metre into the ground surrounded by stone chippings, having the floor tiled all retain heat and use the earths heat. A thermostatic fan heater will then keep the heat around the greenhouse.

  • marshmellomarshmello Posts: 683

    Another good way is using massive rolls of horticutural bubble wrap around the walls. I have seen it in B&Q for £15, not sure the length though. But if stored correctly, it could be a worth while investment especially when used year are year.

    I have to use parrafin as we don't have electricity at the allotment, but a 5ltr container lasts all week - it's £1 a ltr.

  • artjakartjak Posts: 4,167

    marshmello, where are you managing to get paraffin that cheaply? I'm having to pay B&Q £7.00 for 4 litres.image

  • LorrainePLorraineP Posts: 218
    blairs wrote (see)

    Using the sun is the best way but no use during winter. Having the greenhouse in full sun and dug about 1 metre into the ground surrounded by stone chippings, having the floor tiled all retain heat and use the earths heat. A thermostatic fan heater will then keep the heat around the greenhouse.

    Blairs, could you give a little more info 'dug about 1m into the ground surrounded by stone chippings'.  At the moment I'm visulising a sunken greenhouse!  Can't think thats what you mean.  Only ask as I am getting a greenhouse this year and am trying to gather as much info as pos so I get the right base laid.  Thanks.

  • marshmellomarshmello Posts: 683

    Artjak, I buy it from the Allotment Association Shop on site - a not for profit organisation which is run by a few of the gardeners.

    Yes, it can be quite expensive from places like that.

  • I have made myself a propigation bed with heated cables that warm the soil and are controlled by a thermostat, that really helps keep my greenhouse warm.

  • blackestblackest Posts: 623

    I'm using grass,no not smoking it but bags full of clippings as they break down they give off a lot of heat. It's enough to keep the frost at bay overnight. Along with fleece and a few black milk cartons. which are warmed by the sun and release the heat at night as it cools.

    I'm thinking about buying a sidney tube to effectively harvest the suns heat. A single tube is about €65 http://www.solarbook.ie/sydney-vacuum-tube.html

    The link explains better than i can.

  • Tropical SamTropical Sam Posts: 1,488
    LorraineP wrote (see)
    blairs wrote (see)

    Using the sun is the best way but no use during winter. Having the greenhouse in full sun and dug about 1 metre into the ground surrounded by stone chippings, having the floor tiled all retain heat and use the earths heat. A thermostatic fan heater will then keep the heat around the greenhouse.

    Blairs, could you give a little more info 'dug about 1m into the ground surrounded by stone chippings'.  At the moment I'm visulising a sunken greenhouse!  Can't think thats what you mean.  Only ask as I am getting a greenhouse this year and am trying to gather as much info as pos so I get the right base laid.  Thanks.


    Until recently all greenhouses were built into the ground - at least 1 metre with a trench around them. You only really had a top few feet of glass. Frost only penetrates  the top 3 inches and the earth naturally keeps plants above freezing point. If you put stone chippings around the greenhouse (they were built with brick foundations) then that is a heat sink as the stones retain heat. You could make the greenhouse warmer by using hot beds - grass clippings as blackest has said. It takes a bit of work though!

    The bog standard glass greenhouses loose heat as it escapes out very easily. Have a brick foundation and it looses less heat and the brick retains heat. I would also always have a stone/paved floor in a greenhouse. Earth is no use.

  • LorrainePLorraineP Posts: 218

    Blairs: so I wasn't so silly about a sunken greenhouse then?  

    If it has a solid floor will it need drainage?

     

  • Tropical SamTropical Sam Posts: 1,488

    Re drainage, you would need to site it somewhere where it does not flood and water naturally flows away. Bottom of a slope is no good!

    I found this link:

    http://www.tulipsinthewoods.com/plant-care/cheap-and-easy-greenhouse/

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