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Hedge/field Bibdweed

Hi, I'm looking for some advice on dealing with a garden full of Bindweed (amongst other things). Where there was once a lawn there is now an overgrown mix of grass, bindweed, docs and nettles. Unfortunately I work away during the winter and after returning this year things were already well out of control. At the moment the garden is overgrown and I have tackled some of he easier weeds (docs and nettles) but am holding back on strimming what's left as there's bindweed crawling through most of the grass. Is the best idea to strim it all back and then deal with it as it returns? Or should I try to treat the bindweed that's already there (it is a lot!) and then try to restore some order? Many thanks in advance and all advice is very welcome. Tom

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  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 16,527

    I'd nuke the lot with glyphosate now, to give you a clean area to start next spring.

  • Thanks for the swift reply! When you say the lot. Are we talking grass etc? The whole works? If so, what would be the method? Sprays with two week intervals till everything is dead? And once dead does it all need to be removed or just let to break down into the soil?



    Sorry for the questions but I'm somewhat of an uneducated newbie when it comes to gardening. Hence being in this predicament now!



    Many thanks.
  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 16,527

    I spent years digging out bindweed from an area of the veg patch. I thought it would eventually give up. It didn't. When we took over next door, I gave the lot a spray of glyphosate in August. That cleared out all the thistles and bindweed in the main veg plot, but not in the hedges.  I left the worst area on my side fallow the following year and gave it two lots over the year. Bits still appear at the edge of paths, but it is more under control. I dont like using it, but I figure a one off for weedy ground full of perennial weeds is the way to go, to save years of battling it. Black plastic works well on less pernicious weeds.

  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 28,818

    I have missed almost 3 years in my garden thanks to surgeries to fix technical probs with cervical spine and both feet.   While the gardener was away the bindweed came out to play - along with couch grass, nettles, thistles, creeping buttercup, ground ivy and all the usual annual suspects like fat hen and ground elder and bittercress.

    For the last two growing seasons I have started in spring, working my way round the garden clockwise to clear the weeds from my treasures and am almost on top of the problem in 2/3rds of the garden but the beds all round our natural drainage pond are a nightmare as I never got to them before the autumn.

    Last week I took the bull by the horns and have started completely emptying the bed of all my treasures whose roots have been washed and cleaned of every trace of bindweed and then planted in a nursery bed in the veggie plot.   I've forked over the empty bed and taken out barrow loads of weeds, comfrey, excess pulmonaria and the dreaded bindweed roots but I know there'll be some still lurking.  

    The bed will be left vacant till mid or late September so I can nuke any shoots that show and then I shall plant it with cheap and cheerful pansies and primulas for winter so I can watch for, and nuke, any new nasties that show themselves next spring.   It may take two or three goes before the treasures can go back in but it will be worth it.

    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Lou12Lou12 Posts: 1,149
    I never use weedkillers becasue we have slow worms and all manner of interesting wildlife here.

    When we moved into this house the garden was bindweed, ivy and bramble central. We dug it all out and when bindweed appears I just pull it out immediately, I patrol the beds every other day and whip it out.

    After a few years there is very little left. In this area we will never be free of bindweed, it is rife in every hedgerow but it is easy to keep it under control.

    Next door sprayed all of his with the strongest stuff you can get destroying all the wildlife in his garden and 6 months later......yes it has all come back.
  • Lou12Lou12 Posts: 1,149
    Well I tell a small lie I did find a patch I missed a couple of times and it was out of control so I put a coke bottle cut in half over it, sprayed it and left it in place until the bindweed was dead but it is very rare I do that these days.
  • herbaceousherbaceous Posts: 2,314

    Totally with you obelixx, good plan and sooooo satisfying!  My hubbie took sick and passed away and my garden was left to its own devices for 3 years during which time only the nature that is green and persistent in tooth and claw survived and flourished. Oh, and a sycamore took hold and turned into a forty foot nightmare.

    I have spent the last four years picking away at all the weeds that inspire dread, thank goodness for glyphosate, cardboard and our old gazebo now used as a weed suppressant. Only problem with the glyphosate I have found is that the bindweed seems to hang on in a miniaturised version, almost as though the roots didn't quite die and are still determined to come back. Similar phenomenon with bramble although a bit easier to deal with.

    Tom if you have bindweed in any quantity you have to clear the ground completely, leave it undisturbed for even one season and your work will have been for nothing. I have tackled some in my reclaimed veg patch with a fork, and very satisfying it is to get a 2 foot length of root out, but only because this will be dug over at least every three months for the next couple of years.

    Good luck with your 'lawn' love to see a before and after!

     

    "The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."  Sir Terry Pratchett
  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 28,818

    I'm sorry you lost your husband Herbaceous but it sounds as though you have a mission now and it must be satisfying to see the weeds losing the war.    It does seem to get easier each year but the bindweed is, as you say, really slow to take the hint.

    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • herbaceousherbaceous Posts: 2,314

    Thank you obelixx, you are overcoming mighty personal odds and have my total admiration. Do we share a mission? To boldly go more regularly where we should have been more often.......... and it is satisfying isn't it? I confess to being a dedicated veg person so my mission is maybe easier to fulfil as most of the veg get recycled each year leaving the ground clear for weed warfare! And yes, each year it is a little quicker to prepare the beds for planting.

    Unlike yourself I have still to find the courage to get amongst the shrubs which are my 'treasures' as the task ranks alongside swimming the channel and climbing Everest. 

    You have shamed me however and I will make a packed lunch, find my machete and foray into the wilderness. I really hope your treasured plants hang on until you can secure their home from invaders.

    "The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."  Sir Terry Pratchett
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