Oh dear! Is this the beginning of the end?

DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 53,900

We love the two large ash trees at the end of our garden (although their roots cause endless problems). 

However we're slap bang in the middle of an Ash Dieback hotspot, and we've been dreading seeing this ...

 

 

image

 

 

 

“I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 23,990

    Doesn't look too good Dove image

    And somewhere on the hill
    Inside the past we hear the bells
    Catching only parts of thoughts
    And fragments of ourselves
    Till we begin
    Again


  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 53,900

    Doesn't, does it? image

    Apart from anything else, if we have to have them felled, it could be expensive - not to mention how the birds around here will miss them. 

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Bushman2Bushman2 Posts: 548

    Dove are there any splits in the bark near the branches that are dying back. The splits can sometimes be diamond shaped. Hope its drought but if your in a hotspot affraid it could be dieback.

  • WelshonionWelshonion Posts: 3,114
    As I understood it ash dieback affects saplings. Ash has always been prone to having the odd branch die for no apparent reason. It is notorious for suddenly dropping a large branch.



    I hope there is nothing seriously wrong with your trees. I like ash though it is a dreadful seeder. OTOH I do not like sycamore and its habit of seeding everywhere.
  • Bushman2Bushman2 Posts: 548

    Unfortunately Welsh dieback affects both mature trees and saplings. It can be seen in the crown of mature trees which causes the tree to produce lots of new growth lower down. Its not too bad in Scotland yet but just a matter of time. 

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 23,990

    I feel a bit guilty about constantly removing the healthy seedlings at the rear of  my garden image

    It's not a suitable site for them though 

    And somewhere on the hill
    Inside the past we hear the bells
    Catching only parts of thoughts
    And fragments of ourselves
    Till we begin
    Again


  • TopbirdTopbird Posts: 4,626

    Hi Dove

    We have a couple of very mature ash trees in our garden. When the tree surgeon was last here (Last October) he pronounced them both fit and healthy - even though one of them had 'bits' like yours.

    He also said that the presence of Ash dieback doesn't mean an automatic death sentence. The disease is now so prevalent in our area this firm recommends leaving trees in situ & monitoring to see what happens. (unless of course they could become dangerous with falling branches etc)

    I think they are hoping to find that some juvenile and mature trees have a natural resistance to the disease (or are able to withstand an attack of die back) - which would give us hope we won't lose all the ash trees.

    The tree surgeons we used are the ones used by the local council - highly professional and bang up to date with latest news on this problem. I'm sure there are lots of good companies your way too.

    Fingers crossed you can keep them image

     

    Heaven is ... sitting in the garden with a G&T and a cat while watching the sun go down
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 53,900

    Both trees had been hacked about by previous owners - when we came here we had a good firm of tree surgeons come in and lift and lighten the crowns as the hacking about had caused a lot of bushy growth - that would've been late October 2011 - they said that the one on the right as we view them from the house was pretty healthy, but the one on the left wasn't as good - he said possibly because the neighbours' garages are built over half of it's root area.  It's the one on the left that has the branches with the die-back on now.  I suppose it could be the result of a dry summer, but I think that may be wishful thinking.

    Perhaps we'll wait and see what happens next year ... if we do have to take action I don't want to wait until branches have crashed onto next doors' garages or greenhouses.  

    Also we'll have to think about possible replacements - there won't be anything that'll reach the size of the ashes - they're much taller than the house - well, not in a reasonable time anyway - but at least we can plant something that the goldfinches, tits and and woodpeckers will feel at home in before too long.

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • TopbirdTopbird Posts: 4,626

    Would your firm come out and have a look out at it for you Dove? and maybe give some advice whether or not it is the dreaded disease and / or likely to pose any  danger in the near future.

    Ours comes out and does things like that for free - one reason we like to use them when jobs need doing.

    Heaven is ... sitting in the garden with a G&T and a cat while watching the sun go down
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 53,900

    I've just had a good look and spotted the tell tale lesions below the dead areas http://www.forestry.gov.uk/pdf/Symptoms_guide_Chalara_dieback_of_ash_2012.pdf/$FILE/Symptoms_guide_Chalara_dieback_of_ash_2012.pdf 

    I think that when we get back from our holiday we'd better have a word with our tree chap.  

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







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