A fast growing plant to give me privacy.

13

Posts

  • Tetley wrote (see)

    Three years ago I planted some silver birch in huge plastic containers.  They were for screening purposes, and there was no soil to plant them in because the paved area covered an old reinforced tank that belonged to the school next door for their toilet block.   So far these trees are flourishing, and are now about 12ft tall.  There are some trailing plants in there too -  to help disguise the containers, and I thought of placing a bench in front of them.    

    Don`t waste the fact that you have a stump there by the way.....you could make great use of that for a bird bath or planter  image ....or even the base for a table.

    Wow, thanks for the pointers, I never realized you could grow them that high in containers. I am going to investigate that further image Having a tree in a container would definitely be the great option I agree. The few drawbacks I'm imagining is that if they grow too tall then the top cover of the tree might go above the area I need covered so basically the privacy screen which would be formed by the branches might grow too high and then I might be left with just a trunk where I'd like there to be branches covering that area? 

     

  • Tetley wrote (see)

    Ok....I`m a big fan of the silver birch.  I grew one that became enormous- I mean really enormous..and it came down in a gale.  I whipped off a catkin, and sowed the seed in a seed tray.  It produced 106 trees.  I planted a dozen out and sold the rest !!

    One of the ones I planted grew all crooked, so I chopped it down to about 3 feet.  This one has now produced shoots from the base, and is now growing all nice and straight.  Wee hee....you can`t go wrong image

    Lol.. That is Great story - 106 trees is pretty incredible And seems like a good business idea too to grow and sell small-medium sized trees in containers to be used as garden privacy screens. And if they can be maintained and kept at a certain height it's even better.  

    For me though, I've been thinking about it just now and it might not be the ideal solution for my own set up because my privacy screen isn't quite for the same reason. My screen really just needs to be about 2.5m high but also about 2 to 3 metres wide (depending on where it's placed). A tree might be a bit of a gamble in terms of it's shape, size and branch angles - and also not wide enough for this task.  

    I'm thinking about maybe a bamboo or willow fence, you don't have any experience with bolt-down fence supports by any chance? I've never tried to put up fence posts before but I think I need just 2 or 3 posts - then I can wrap a bamboo fence around it. Problem is though, that it would be on my decking outside and so the edge of the decking would have a single 2 metre wide bamboo fence which might look a bit odd image

     

  • nemracnemrac Posts: 42

    If you go with your trellis idea then what about something like Virginia Creeper - growes really quickly - plenty of buck for your bang - and the leaves will turn a lovely shade of red in the Autumn.

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 25,881

    I made this last year  - it provides extra privacy from the boundary as the whole garden borders a pavement -

    http://i1331.photobucket.com/albums/w595/fairygirl55/P8230004_zps76923744.jpg

    It now looks like this, and there's a final piece of timber still to along the top 

    http://i1331.photobucket.com/albums/w595/fairygirl55/DSCF0373_zpsqlj5txaw.jpg

     If you leave aside the two containers, it's really just two posts with two horizontals. Verticals screwed on (of a lighter weight) and then two more horizontals to enclose them. The timber was painted first - worth doing. You can buy the ready mixed concrete for doing the posts if you don't want to mix it yourself. You can then plant it up as you see fit, but it can be  made attractive as a feature in it's own right. It really wasn't expensive.

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Fairygirl wrote (see)

    I made this last year  - it provides extra privacy from the boundary as the whole garden borders a pavement -

    http://i1331.photobucket.com/albums/w595/fairygirl55/P8230004_zps76923744.jpg

    It now looks like this, and there's a final piece of timber still to along the top 

    http://i1331.photobucket.com/albums/w595/fairygirl55/DSCF0373_zpsqlj5txaw.jpg

     If you leave aside the two containers, it's really just two posts with two horizontals. Verticals screwed on (of a lighter weight) and then two more horizontals to enclose them. The timber was painted first - worth doing. You can buy the ready mixed concrete for doing the posts if you don't want to mix it yourself. You can then plant it up as you see fit, but it can be  made attractive as a feature in it's own right. It really wasn't expensive.

    Wow! That looks very nice indeed Fairygirl... I want one image

    That would actually fit my purposes just right, it's about the exact size I need. The difference with my set up is that I think I'd need to put the posts on my decking so I was thinking about using bolt-down fence supports although I'm beginning to wonder if the relatively thin wood of a decking plank would support the weight of two fence posts, in theory the plank of wood might just flip over or rip and the fence might just topple over - especially in a strong breeze which would exert pressure on the base (the plank of wood). 

    Hmmm, I did also consider putting a post in the ground just next to the decking with cement, and then have another post on the decking supported by a bolt-down fence support - I think that might be the best way of doing it for me.

    image

     

     

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 25,881

    You can get posts 'notched out' which will then slide onto your decking, and are then screwed into place. A joiner will have the tools to do it. We did that in a previous garden where we built a raised deck and the handrails were done like that. Unfortunately I don't have a pic that shows it clearly. However, that was to support handrails -  it might be better to consider cutting out holes in the decking and then concreting your posts in. If it was me, that's the way I'd do it. image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • I'm really hoping to do it DIY to economise as much as possible, a joiner here in London is going to probably run up some costs (I'd guess?). I'm a little hesitant about cutting holes in the decking because the area is right near the underground gas pipes and the internal fuse box (which has wires to some lights on the decking. Here's a snap to get a better idea: the fence would be against my house at 90 degrees from a side wall (going across the decking left to right )

    image

     

    Another thing springs to mind, under the decking is the concrete foundation (as opposed to soil) so I'd have to drill into the existing concrete, lay the cement, return decking plank to it's place, then plant the post in the cement (threaded through the hole in the plank)? Would that be too big a job doing for a DIYer like me?   

     

     

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 25,881

    I'm a bit confused now. Bearing in mind your other thread re putting honeysuckle etc on wires between your shed and the fence, wouldn't it be easier to put posts in over there with a simple screen to plant a climber or two on? If you need (or want)  something else beside the deck, you could plant a couple of shrubs - you already have a large Phormium. Why not clear all that area thoroughly and put a Choisya or something between the Phormium and the house wall. Put a gravel mulch down between the shrubs and the shed to keep it all tidy, until you decide if you want anything else  there.

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Basically I'd just like that area covered where you can see the top of the fence, about to the top of that fence post on the left so I had originally thought of putting wire attached to the top of that post (or the next post along to the left which is out of shot), then going slightly diagonally across to my shed there. I actually like the decking as it is, would prefer to avoid the fence but I was just thinking through all possibilities. 

    You might well be right thought, I could just put two posts in front of the existing fence then put some sort of trelliss or screen for the vine to grow along? That may well be the best idea yet, I should have probably post a photo earlier for you lol.. 

    I didn't know that was a Phormium! Thanks for educating a novice. And neither was I savvy with the world of Choisyas but I just Googled them and they do look very grand indeed. Would look beautiful in that space, I may well have to get one too. image

    I did have a secondary usage for the fence idea though - because I'm growing my first tomato and chilli plants - I was thinking I might be able to train them to grow up the fence so it would have doubled-up as a large trellis but the more I think about it now, the fence does seem like a bad idea. Not to mention it would be right outside my kitchen window to the left of it and would block out quite a bit of light. 

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 25,881

    Little steps Gorguruga image

    Tomatoes need warmth - and space if you want quite a lot. We have a 'resident' expert on toms on the forum (Italophile) , as well as loads of people who are very able where growing veg is concerned, so you'll get lots of info on those for next year. 

    I think you should clear all the area in front of your fence ( between the fence and your deck) and take stock. If you need that area as a 'work' area - ie washing etc, I'd forget about doing anything too involved there at the moment.

    If you're looking for advice, posting pix is very helpful as people here have lots of experience of what's possible in terms of aspect and space. Plants are expensive, and giving them the best start is always worth it. It also depends on budget and how much time you have to spend on maintaining your garden. No point in having a high maintenance plot if you work long hours and have other commitments    image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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