Another Bee Box Q

Hi image

I bought 1000 tubes for bees to live in and don't know what to do with them!

Is it better to have several modest tube villages or one huge tube city?

Would the bees prefer to have the front and back of the tubes accessible or just one end for and entrance while the other end is boxed in?

Would it be better to have the entrances fully exposed or would something like slats be an idea to keep wind and rain off?

Should the tubes be organised by tube diameter or is a jumble of diameters better?

Could I possibly attract too many bees so that they are practically a big stinging swarm even though acting independently or do they tend to potter about a bit more?

Might an actual swarm move in?

How close to the ground could the tubes be?

Direct sunlight or not?

Are solitary bees the sting and die type?

Do they tolerate other insect neighbours?

Ummmmmmmm I think that's all I can think of for now... Thanks.

Posts

  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 14,857

    Crikey, you've got more questions in you than my little 3 year old "nephie".image

    Here are some answers to some of your questions.

    http://www.foxleas.com/bee_house.htm

     

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • Gillian53Gillian53 Posts: 112

    I've bought boxes before with the tubes already in and had great success. All the tubes filled and the majority hatched. However, when I read about solitary bee houses it seems that if you leave them out year after year that parasites and disease can become a problem as time goes on. So this year I bought bee tubes and as advised by Google I lined them with brown paper. I can then remove the paper tubes and put them somewhere cold in a box over winter. When the weather warms up I'll place the paper tubes somewhere sunny and dry and the bees will hopefully hatch directly from the paper tubes. This then ensures that If there are any parasites they will be in the paper tubes and the wooden/bamboo will be clean and ready for next year. They are quite expensive to throw away.

  • Gillian53Gillian53 Posts: 112

    I think it was a site called Crown Bees that had a lot of info. But there's plenty out there about bee tubes.

  • Gillian53Gillian53 Posts: 112

    I've bought boxes before with the tubes already in and had great success. All the tubes filled and the majority hatched. However, when I read about solitary bee houses it seems that if you leave them out year after year that parasites and disease can become a problem as time goes on. So this year I bought bee tubes and as advised by Google I lined them with brown paper. I can then remove the paper tubes and put them somewhere cold in a box over winter. When the weather warms up I'll place the paper tubes somewhere sunny and dry and the bees will hopefully hatch directly from the paper tubes. This then ensures that If there are any parasites they will be in the paper tubes and the wooden/bamboo will be clean and ready for next year. They are quite expensive to throw away.

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