Silver birch removal

Looks like it's gone
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Posts

  • Bunny ...Bunny ... Posts: 3,455
    Or not grown image
  • DebsterDebster Posts: 5
    Ooh where did it go.....sorry!!

    Have a silver birch with massive fungal infection that's died. Wanted to remove and plant young cherry and apple trees nearby but am worried about the persistence of fungal spores in the soil and the effect on subsequent planting. Any advice please?
  • figratfigrat Posts: 1,619
    Was it honey fungus?
  • DebsterDebster Posts: 5
    Don t know. Had huge mushroom type growths from trunk when we moved here. Husband says it was `angel something?!!
  • DebsterDebster Posts: 5
    Looks like a birch polypore or bracket fungus if had to choose image that matches but don't know if all fungi look like that when extensive.

    Do we just not have to plant there when we ve removed the tree?!
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener LeicsPosts: 6,490

    Hi Debster, the bracket fungus may have been a secondary thing, so check if it was honey fungus which actually killed the tree.  To do that, strip the bark off of the trunk at ground level.  If you find a mass of bootlace-like threads running from the ground up the trunk, beneath the bark, that would indicate honey fungus and it would be inadvisable to plant another tree there or nearby.  If you don't see anything like that and as long as you have the roots ground out, it would be relatively safe to plant another tree.  Bracket fungi grow within the tree and don't spread through the ground, unlike the devastating honey fungus which will often go on to infect the whole garden (a single honey fungus can cover an area the size of several football pitches!)

    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • figratfigrat Posts: 1,619
    Fingers crossed it's not honey fungus.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 43,694

    This might be helpful http://apps.rhs.org.uk/advicesearch/profile.aspx?pid=180 - the photos are useful aids to identification, they show the 'bootlaces' particularly well.

    If you scroll down there's a link which gives some of the trees and shrubs which are more resistent than some to honey-fungus.image

    No-one knows if you've done your housework, but everyone knows if you've done your gardening !
  • Bunny ...Bunny ... Posts: 3,455
    What causes honey fungus ?
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 43,694

    It's a fungus - it exists - this tells you how it spreads 

    The fungus spreads underground by direct contact between the roots of infected and healthy plants and also by means of black, root-like structures called rhizomorphs (often known to gardeners as ‘bootlaces’), which can spread from infected roots through soil, usually in the top 15cm (6in) but as deep as at least 45cm (18in), at up to 1m (3¼ft) per year. It is this ability to spread long distances through soil that makes honey fungus such a destructive pathogen, often attacking plants up to 30m (100ft) away from the source of infection.  extract from RHS Advice linked to above.

    No-one knows if you've done your housework, but everyone knows if you've done your gardening !
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