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Very unusual plant

PassionatePassionate Posts: 225

image

 Has anyone ever grown an Echium Pininana tree plant, as shown in the picture I have been growing this for five years or more. The first two years it was a mass of leaves about two feet high then following year one mighty stalk about 5feet with lovely pink flowers and the bees love it. Then as it was going over it produced  three stalks from the main stem, now this year the three have grown and flowered beautifully but now going to seed. I'm wondering if i cut it down would it start a new shoot? The seeds take years to grow. Any advice is welcome.

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  • PassionatePassionate Posts: 225

    Hi Verdun, yes that's right they are fantastic talking points in the garden.

    I have always kept mine in a large pot so that I can put it in the green house over winter, perhaps this has restricted the growth but it still gets high enough for me.

    im just so pleased that I have managed to grow it for five years now, but although I have collected seeds this year I would hate to lose the main plant.

    I understand they seed all over the place but I've yet to recognise a seedling, I think I've dug them up by mistake.

    i have seeds in pots (a few for luck) and if I'm lucky To grow them I will have to nurture them for a few years before they are as big as this one now.

    Gardening is as much a concern as it is exciting.

     

     

  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 25,217

    Lyn gave me some of her seed earlier this year and they've germinated well. I have about 20 in the cool tunnel and I'll plat them out next year, AND sow more seed.

    Devon.
  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 8,048

    Passionate. I am surprised yours has not died. They are supposed to die after flowering.

    Somewhere in my heart
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    Silver splits the blue
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  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 15,920

    They make stronger plants if left to self seed, I have done both but the self seeders look stronger.

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • PassionatePassionate Posts: 225

    Hi Punkdoc,

    I know I am so lucky, I think that's why I want to hold onto this one, silly i know but I feel such an achievement even managing to grow  it,

    then for it to branch out another three stalks before the main stem died I feel so privileged in a way.

     

    Hi Lyn

    wow you sound experienced if you can pass on tips of how to grow seeds or anything about growing the plant really, I would be so grateful.????

     

     

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 61,322

    There are huge echiums in the churchyard in Cromer (right on the edge of the North Sea) as Verdun says 20ft plus - I'm sure they've been there for a few years now - the flower stalks die down but new ones seem to grow from the base.  I suppose they could be self-seeded image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • PassionatePassionate Posts: 225

    Hi Verdun, yes that's right they are fantastic talking points in the garden.

    I have always kept mine in a large pot so that I can put it in the green house over winter, perhaps this has restricted the growth but it still gets high enough for me.

    im just so pleased that I have managed to grow it for five years now, but although I have collected seeds this year I would hate to lose the main plant.

    I understand they seed all over the place but I've yet to recognise a seedling, I think I've dug them up by mistake.

    i have seeds in pots (a few for luck) and if I'm lucky To grow them I will have to nurture them for a few years before they are as big as this one now.

    Gardening is as much a concern as it is exciting.

     

     

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 15,920

    Heres  one of mine from seed sown last summer, it will flower next year, it's on a trunk about four inches diameter already, and is four ft across  hope the frost doesn't take it.

    image

     

     

     

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 15,920

    In the winter they go black and soggy, but seem to spring up again in summer, no secrets to growing from seeds, you can't stop them, the little seedlings look like a teasel seedling, pimply and rough, and very bright green.

    just sow in Spring or early summer, as any other seed, not much heat, you can't go wrong.

    i have just ordered some dark blue ones, seeds, it seems the rabbits don't like them!

     Sorry that photo is sideways, I tried turning it every way but it insisted on doing that, if you click on it will be right way.

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

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