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A summer day in The Netherlands

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 This picture is from my regional broadcaster here in The Netherlands. It was taken after yesterday's storm.

Yesterday I had planned to spend a nice day pottering around in the garden, but the weather had other ideas.image

We had the worst summer storm ever recorded, with force 10 gales along the coast and even here in the midde of the country we got up to force 8!

The authorities gave out a code red weather alert for large parts of the country and even we here had a code orange. At one point they even asked people not to go out unless absolutely necessary!

One person died when his car was hit by a falling tree and at least 2 others were injured in similar incidents.

The wind caused quite a lot of damage in my garden. Climbers came off their supports and herbacious plants were ripped to pieces.

The vegetable plot looks like a bomb has hit it. But the storm has gone, and I'd better start cleaning up the rubbish.

My daily round of the news on the web threw up some amazing video clips and pictures though.

First this of a tree along one of the canals in Amsterdam.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FiE8lkFr6kU

And if you've ever wondered if you can get seasick on a plane, have a look at this.

Schiphol Airport, yesterday...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=02ddnGzxNZs

And the people on board this one had an even scarier experience. Just read the text with the video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nio38kxye-I

And finally some pictures, mainly of trees...

http://www.rtlnieuws.nl/nieuws/binnenland/fotos-zo-ziet-vernieling-door-storm-eruit

Makes you realise the power of nature.

But now everything is calm again and the sun is shining, so I'm off into the garden to start the big clean-up.image

 

 

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Posts

  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 32,352

    wow

    Devon.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 20,544

    Wow, those pilots earn their money, don't they? image

    The pictures remind me of the storm that hit the south of England in October 1987. 

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Storm_of_1987

    I slept through it image and woke up to see a similar picture to yoursimage

    The damage is always worse when the trees are still in full leaf. It makes them so much more liable to being blown over. Here in 1987 there were so many fallen trees that it was almost impossible to remove them all. Thousands were left lying where they fell. The result has been a fantastic opportunity for fungi and wildlife to occupy new habitats.image

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 79,264

    Glad you're ok Kleipieper image

    I remember the storm of 1987 very well - our village was cut off by fallen trees for several days and we had no electricity for more than a week .

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,145

    We're used to stormy weather here but it's mainly in winter when there's less disruption and damage to gardens. Horrible when it's a freak storm at this time of year. Hope the garden recovers.

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Oh dear!

    Until end of May I was flying through Schippol every week.  I transferred there to go to Vienna and/or Zurich to go to work.   

    Believe me I could talk forever about the winds blowing across that airport and the awful landings, delays and diversions because of it!    Just in April I was shunted into Rotterdam instead of Amsterdam for 2 hours before going to Amsterdam by when I'd missed my transfer and had to stay in a hotel and return to England the next morning!      Me and thousands of others! 

    I hope you and yours are safe and well... that's all that matters.

  • Steve 309Steve 309 Posts: 2,753

    Hmmm.  Impressive.  Lots of rain but little wind in Southamptom on Friday.

  • kleipieperkleipieper Posts: 563

    Thanks everyone for your kind words! image 

    We're used to strong gales here, just like in the UK, but not at this time of year.

    I've just been hoisting several climbers, including roses, back on to their supports, so scratches on arms, legs and face. image Looks very fetching. image

    And the compost heap has suddenly become a lot fuller and rather colourful because of all the broken flowers.image

    Most of the beans in my veggie plot were also beyond help, so I'll be sowing new ones tomorrow. Who knows, I may still get a crop.

    Several beautiful trees blown over here in town as well.image And our council is not very good at replanting...

    Let's hope we won't get any more gales soon.

  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 20,544

    Could you not leave the bean haulms in the ground? They would probably regrow.image

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • kleipieperkleipieper Posts: 563

    Well, I had a good look at them, but most of them were completely broken and I don't think they would grow again.

    I've been growing beans for over 40 years, but I've never seen anything like this damage.image

    Better cut my losses and start again!

  • donutsmrsdonutsmrs Posts: 479

    I love your country, my husband and I have been many times staying at Duinrell, Wassenaar. What awful weather you have had. So sorry your garden has been so badly damaged but glad you are all safe and well.

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