GW gardening clubs

One of the things I wanted to do when I retired was to join a gardening club but I found that the local ones had closed down. Reading the seed and plant swap threads on this forum made me realise that people love and need contact with other gardeners. I began to wonder whether the network here, which involves far more people than usually contribute publicly, could lead to the formation of new clubs, even if they met only once a month or once every two months. There could then be local seed and plant swaps and the chance to get local gardening gurus to speak on topics of relevance,as well as the opportunity to visit each other's gardens. It could also be an extension of the GW 'empire' and create renewed interest in the programme and magazine. 

«1

Posts

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 15,234
    Sounds nice but I think we are all so far apart to meet up, maybe not though.

    There s not much going on like this where I live, but I know there are some people in Cornwall.

    My other half says if he ever meets Monty Don he may just throttle him,!!!! image
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • The usual suspects who contribute are too far apart. It depends on those who use this forum and never actually contribute publicly, and also who they know who might be interested. (Some threads have had several thousand visits and far fewer contributors.) I'd love to see a resurgence of local gardening networks.

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 15,234
    We had one in the village where we used to live but it folded due to lack of interest. I wasn't gardening then.
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • LeggiLeggi Posts: 489
    I think it was the RHS last year who stated that gardening had effectively skipped two generations. David Cameron then likened gardening to litter-picking and labelled it unskilled labour. Gardening at the moment, when people are working harder than ever to pay the bills, is at a really low ebb. It's such a shame as we all know the benefits we ourselves derive from our hobby, the childhood Christmas Day feeling you experience seeing the first sweet pea flower of the year, the taste of the first ripe tomato picked and seeing the bees return in the spring like an old friend.



    Gardening has lost it's way a bit, in an age where society wants instant satisfaction (garden centres selling tomato plants with already fully ripe tommies on) we are facing a struggle. Things like local gardening clubs would do the world of good, allotment sites should invite local schools for visits and grow extra plants for the children to take home and we should all encourage our friends and family to take it up. Not because we know how to do things properly (or not most of the time in my case) but because we know the happiness sitting in the midst of summer garden brings, that hard work pays off and that really it's ok to be proud of something you've created.



    I really hope this idea takes off, it's up to us though to try to make sure our enjoyment isn't wasted for another generation.
  • Many have folded, I think. So in this day of easier travel, they would have to cover a somewhat larger area, but could then still be viable. They'd need publicity and relevant activities, though traditional things could still be done.

    P.S. In case you think I never sleep, I've been off-colour today and have spent the day alternately dozing and following this forum. So, now, I'm not tired! Must be better!

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 15,234
    Hope you feel fit in the morning, gg. I am here because I don't sleep anyway.

    I have just finished reading Dracula on my tablet, must find another to read now

    Nite all.
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Hi Lyn. hope you enjoyed Drac, though it doesn't sound like a book to lead you into peaceful sleep! I'm reading at the other end of the spectrum, 'The Hawk and the Dove.' Now there's a gentle, relaxing book.

    I'd love to hear from other gardeners who follow this forum, maybe those who don't usually contribute publicly, to learn whether or not there is any interest in this idea. (The clubs, not the bedtime books!!)

  • BrummieBenBrummieBen Posts: 459
    Leggi wrote (see)
    I think it was the RHS last year who stated that gardening had effectively skipped two generations. David Cameron then likened gardening to litter-picking and labelled it unskilled labour. Gardening at the moment, when people are working harder than ever to pay the bills, is at a really low ebb. It's such a shame as we all know the benefits we ourselves derive from our hobby, the childhood Christmas Day feeling you experience seeing the first sweet pea flower of the year, the taste of the first ripe tomato picked and seeing the bees return in the spring like an old friend.

    Gardening has lost it's way a bit, in an age where society wants instant satisfaction (garden centres selling tomato plants with already fully ripe tommies on) we are facing a struggle. Things like local gardening clubs would do the world of good, allotment sites should invite local schools for visits and grow extra plants for the children to take home and we should all encourage our friends and family to take it up. Not because we know how to do things properly (or not most of the time in my case) but because we know the happiness sitting in the midst of summer garden brings, that hard work pays off and that really it's ok to be proud of something you've created.

    I really hope this idea takes off, it's up to us though to try to make sure our enjoyment isn't wasted for another generation.

    I don't agree with you on this, I'm 38 yrs old, and have become interested in gardening for about 6 or 7 years now. My friends also have become interested. I think most of us became interested due to having kids, and wanting to grow organic veg and fruit. Also to create places our kids can enjoy, as well as where the adults can relax. The driving force behind 'organic' gardening is price. I have 2 kids and a third of our grocery bill was fruit and veg. When my friends came around for BBQ's etc at first they were sceptical, but now a good few have a go at growing their own, mainly as I showed it wasn't hard, and most rewarding.

    Statistics currently support this, in the 25-40 age group, interest in growing your own and also gardening in general has exploded in the last 5 years. This is bourne out by the length of waiting lists for allotments also. I think gardening is enjoying a resurgance, and this is likely to continue for the forseeable future. Most parents of any intelligence are encouraging their kids to grow produce and flowers, and this is also being encouraged by primary schools also.

    I can't see the prices of organic fruit and veg going down anytime soon, I also doubt I'll find anything from a supermarket shelf will taste as good as homegrown.

    Gardening clubs have declined, like many clubs, quite possibly due to the constant bombardment of 'selfishness' and 'looking after number one' advertising that is being rammed down everyone's throats. Consequently many people are suspicious of others, whereas before they would have socialised more freely.

    Another rant for you GG, hope you liked it!

  • FloBearFloBear Posts: 2,281

    GG, I think it needs someone in an area to  take the initiative and put on a little event - say plant swap - and see what interest there is.
    I'm on my local Parish Council and in our recent survey we had a good number of suggestions for 'things to do' like Lunch Club, car share etc, and even offers of help but no-one hopping up and down to organise and run it themselves! We communicate with the residents as much as possible by email and that helps to spread the word quickly and cheaply but laminated posters on noticeboards, telegraph poles etc. are a great help too.

  • kate1123kate1123 Posts: 2,815

    Surely forums have replaced Gardening clubs, I can get good advice 24 hours a day, I can share photos of my successes and get a variety of opinions on my failures.

    The main advantages are that I can do this whenever I want, whilst eating my breakfast and without the expense of putting petrol in my car or trying to find somewhere to park. I do not have to leave the house on a icy night and worry about getting home safely.

    I fully appreciate that gardening clubs have their place in some communities but for many of us forums have replaced them.

Sign In or Register to comment.