Plum tree problem

Would appreciate some advice please.

I recently moved home and inherited a plum tree about 18 feet in height.. It bloomed well this year and lots of fruit appeared. Then the leaves went all shiny and sticky with lots of aphids underneath. The fruits started to wither & drop and I also noticed areas of black on the bark together with dark globules of sap. It seemed to affect other things in the garden so I took the radical step of cutting it to about head height leaving just three short branches above the trunk.

I imagine this wasn't the best course of action but due to the size of the tree, any spraying was out of the question. Will it be any good now if I keep the growth to a lower level or should I dispense with it altogether?

Any help much appreciated. Thank you

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Posts

  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 16,193

    You are right when you say that it wasn't the best thing to do. Cut it down. The wood is good if you have a wood burning stove.

    All that will happen is that next spring dozens of long, vertical water shoots will zoom upwards towards the sky. They will not flower. Next summer you will think of pruning them down to a shorter length. They will try to head for the sky again. They will not flower that year either.

    Stop. Dig it out. Refresh the soil. Find another plant for that space.

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,516

    I agree with Pansyface - all good things must come to an end and this plum tree's time is up image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 16,193

    On the broken branch in picture number two? It looks like canker maybe.

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 8,265

    Yes, I' agree with that Pansyface - looks like a bacterial canker to me.  The tree's a gonna when it gets as bad as that Geoff, so look at it as an opportunity for planting something new.

     

    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • geoff979geoff979 Posts: 13

    Thanks very much for all the replies I much appreciate it. I somehow guessed that would be the answer. I shall remove it without delay.

  • LoganLogan Posts: 2,532
    It could be aphids, but I wouldn't dig it up if you keep pruning it won't fruit you have to leave it for now it will fruit maybe next year or year after it won't fruit on new woodimage
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 8,265

    Jo, it shouldn't, but as a general rule I would never grow the same species of plant/tree in exactly the same spot as one which was diseased.  If I had to, I'd dig out a large hole and swap the soil with that from another part of the garden.  Just general garden hygiene and a case of 'better safe than sorry' really. image

    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • geoff979geoff979 Posts: 13

    Thanks Btg I was wondering what I could plant there. Not another plum then.

    The root will probably be difficult to remove so as it's in the middle of a lawn I'll grass it over. One less obstacle to mow around, and I've still got three nice fruiting apple trees.

     

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