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Bee identification

Hi,

Last year we had a lots of tree bumble bee's coming and going from somewhere in our out-house. This year there seems to be different ones and i wondered if anyone knew any easy way of telling the difference between a honey bee and a solitary bee as I understand they look similar to the untrained eye? Not sure if this provides a clue but we've found a few dead/dying ones on the ground outside (which I understand is normal as these will be worker bees?).

Any help would be appreciated!

 

Posts

  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 21,255

    They don't really look very similar when you see two side by side. Here are some solitary bees

    http://bumblebeeconservation.org/about-bees/identification/other-bees/

    Honey bees are less hairy and more stripey

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 21,255

    But there are fewer varieties of honey bees, most of which in this country look like this

    http://barnsleybeekeepers.org.uk/species.html

    especially the ones in Barnsleyimage

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,877

    The trouble I have with IDing bees is that they won't stay still while I line them up with a picture

  • Honeybee is a dark brown looking wasp. Solitary bees are too numerous to be worth bothering with an ID. The rest will likely beeimage Buff/White tailed, Red Tailed and a few carder bees.

  • landgirl100landgirl100 Posts: 655

    The Field Studies Council do a nice fold-out ID card for bee ID, you can get them direct from the FSC or from Amazon (not expensive).

    http://www.field-studies-council.org/publications/pubs/guide-to-bees-of-britain.aspx

     

  • MarkNMarkN Posts: 17
    Thanks all, I'm figuring they can't be solitary bees as I'd imagine the chances of several 'solitary' wasps all dying in our back yard within a few days of each other are small. They definately are more the 'wasp' shape and stripes (but deffo not a wasp). I wonder if they are honey bees then..
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 21,255

    Stick a photo on here and someone will say.image

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • MarkNMarkN Posts: 17
    Aye pansy face, I'll take one next time I see on image thanks
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