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wormary

hi, as part of my study I am designing a wormary to be designed for kitchen use the idea is to have a small wormary in your kitchen to provide the user with compost and worm tea all year round. i am looking for feed back not so much terms of aesthetics but in terms of functionality and features. any feedback would be greatly appreciated thanks.

Posts

  • Blue OnionBlue Onion Posts: 2,900

    An easy way to drain off the fluid, but with some sort of simple lock that my 13 month old couldn't figure out (nothing worse than worm tea all over the floor of the pantry).  

    A good filter to keep the earthy wormy smells from intermingling with your Christmas dinner in a hot humid kitchen.

    Utah, USA.
  • Hi guys, first of all thank you both for you quick replys.. I like the idea of the child safety lock or feature and will Deffeintly develop the idea. Secondly edd the main aim of the whole point this to design a nice well Designed, smaller wormary to encourage family's or couples to compost and reduce organic matter that is sent to landfill whilst also arise questions about 'what is that?' Or 'that's nice what is it?' When sat proudly on the kitchen counter, further encouraging people to start their own wormaries. I feel there is a negative stigma attached to worms.. When in fact knowing not really much about them before this project started , I now find them quite fascinating.. Thanks guys
  • Blue OnionBlue Onion Posts: 2,900

    Thanks for the link Edd.. interesting reading.  image

     

    Ryan - what do you anticipate people will do with the 'product' of their bins?  I looked a bit into it years ago, when I was living in a tiny flat with no outdoor space for a wormery (which is why I would assume one would keep it indoors rather than out- due to a lack of space).  Once you've top dressed all your house plants, and filled every windowsill.. what does one do with the excess worm dirt?  

    Lol.. I'm suddenly envisioning midnight deposits of bags of worm soil on the neighbors doorsteps, like one does with excess courgettes.  Or perhaps quietly stepping off the path in Richmond Park to empty your backpack of soil into the woods.  

    Utah, USA.
  • Well from what I've read the compost doesn't have to be used straight away it can be stored until your ready to use again and as a trend growing your own vegetables is becoming a 'thing'.. I figured if there was no need for the end product then said people would be less likely to buy one bit even in the small garden we have bedding plants and hanging baskets.. But free soil for all would be good aha
  • Blue OnionBlue Onion Posts: 2,900

    It would be fantastic for classrooms.  Could you do some sort of pull-away opaque side that would allow you to view a large acrylic 'window', so students can catch a view of the worms in action, and view the striations in progress.  Perhaps do scientific measurements of the material 'disappearing'.  I think that's where your real indoor market would be, and any sales to families would be secondary.  

    Utah, USA.
  • Thanks again I've set up a small scale one in my shed about a week ago they seem to be happy when I lift the lid off every now and again to put some bits in.
  • Blue OnionBlue Onion Posts: 2,900

    Edd.. it takes a whole lot to offend me, and telling me I'm wrong in a subject I know nothing/very little about is perfectly acceptable (especially when coming from someone who is passionate about the subject at hand, AND considered our forum resident expert).  image

    It doesn't stop me from adding my two pence here and there, I always feel sorry for those posts that have 0 comments.. and will happily say what I think may be helpful.. and cross my fingers that someone else will come along and correct me if I'm far off the mark.  

    Utah, USA.
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