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The history of the land we call our garden.

daydaisydaydaisy Posts: 372

I live in a bungalow that is built on what was previously a farmhouse. So far we have found a horseshoe, an old clay pipe, a farm gate hinge and a blue Victorian brick.this makes me wonder about the lives of the people who lived and worked on this land. What have you unearthed on your patch of ground?

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  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 64,635

    Isn't it fascinating! image

    Here are some earlier posts on a similar theme

    http://www.gardenersworld.com/forum/the-potting-shed/buried-treasure/277795.html

    http://www.gardenersworld.com/forum/the-potting-shed/buried-treasure/173303.html

    We've got lots of new forum members since those threads - hopefully they've found lots of buried treasure too image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Lily PillyLily Pilly Central southern Scotland Posts: 3,845

    We had to clear some very overgrown woodland and found a small iron 5 spoke wheel, an old hand lantern and many small tools!

    Weeds are flowers, too, once you get to know them.”
    A A Milne
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 26,165

    I once dug up, what I think is , a fossilised seed pod. Nobody has been able to identify it though.

    Devon.
  • Our place was built on a lorry repair yard took ages to repair compacted oily soil imagebut found loads of small lorry bits and heavy-duty wire meshing which has been really useful and the chairman has made a lovely wooden pergola with mesh insertsimage

  • ButtercupdaysButtercupdays Posts: 3,132

    If you know the name of the farmhouse you could look it up on the 1901 census and find out who was living in it then. I did that for our house and unearthed a sad little story, with the help of the census and FreeBMD.org. A woman had a child just before Christmas and then died shortly after. The family managed to keep the baby alive till the census in March/ April, but then it too died. I dread to think of what it was like up here in the Pennines with a tiny baby to care for through the winter. It's bad enough now with central heating and hot water and a supermarket to provide the food, but the town is 4 miles away and they were farmers with animals to care for too.

  • happymarionhappymarion Posts: 4,591

    My bungalow was built in 1928 on a farmer's field which was called the spring field so the name of the bungalow is "Springfield"  So far I have not found a spring.so perhaps it is named after the season.  I do have loads of spring flowers.  My boys used to dig up bones, mostly fox or cat which they gave dinosaur- like names to. and displayed in their "Museum".

  • Lily PillyLily Pilly Central southern Scotland Posts: 3,845

    Lovely Marion, lucky you. We live at Springhill, not a spring flower to be seen when we moved in ten years ago but plenty of boggy ground. We found 7 springs and have spent a lot of time and effort putting in rumbling drains which has only helped a little!!!

    Weeds are flowers, too, once you get to know them.”
    A A Milne
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