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Apple tree cuttings

I want to do some hardwood apple tree cuttings. What is the best way to go about this? Is sand a good idea for getting them rooted. Once rooted when can I plant them out in position? Will they be ready to plant by mid summer?

how would you do apple tree cuttings?

Posts

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 74,860

    The best way to propagate apple trees is to graft a cutting onto a rootstock.  If you root  a cutting direct into the ground you're likely to get a tree which will grow 30ft tall or more and put all its energy into this growth rather than fruiting. 

    The best thing to do is to get a dwarfing rootstock which will restrict the tree's growth to a reasonable height and width suitable for your needs (there are different types which restrict to different degrees) and graft your cutting onto the rootstock.

    There is some information here https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=443 .  There are others on this forum who have far more experience in grafting than I do - hopefully they'll see this thread and contribute image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Invicta2Invicta2 Posts: 663

    It is very difficult for an amateur to propagate an apple from cuttings, they are very difficult to root. What you could try is layering a small branch, which will give you a clone of the tree, but you will end up with a very big tree. Better to graft as recommended by Dovefrom above.

  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 19,277

    If you look at the third example of an ancient apple tree, the Shustoke apple, on this page you will see that apple trees have been grafted onto rootstocks for hundreds of years. It was seen as a necessity even then:

    http://www.bernwodeplants.co.uk/oldesttree2.htm

     

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • TootsietimTootsietim Posts: 178

    In my college days we were taught that as apples are nigh on impossible to root ( and, as explained above, need to be grafted onto a rootstock to determine the growth of the tree)  it isn't done. Commercially, the rootstocks were produced by stooling or layering, and these are then used for grafting.

    I would be interested to know whether anyone has ever grown their own rootstocks.

  • How long does it take for a root stock to develop from stooling?

  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 19,277

    This American (?) website suggests two years.

    http://www.waldeneffect.org/blog/How_to_grow_your_own_rootstocks/

     

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • Tootsietim says:

    In my college days we were taught that as apples are nigh on impossible to root ( and, as explained above, need to be grafted onto a rootstock to determine the growth of the tree)  it isn't done. Commercially, the rootstocks were produced by stooling or layering, and these are then used for grafting.

    I would be interested to know whether anyone has ever grown their own rootstocks.

    See original post

    Bramley Apple tree cuttings can most definitely be rooted as this has been done, lately.

    I took note that difficult cuttings to root should be Irish cuttings with a heel. I got three out of seven cuttings to root. These three rooted cuttings are growing vigorously as they are on their own root  same as the original Southall - Nottinghamshire 'Bramley' which was a seedling tree from a pip. That tree is about 200 years old now & still produces fruit. On it's own root it is very vigorous and grows to around 30 ft. Bramleys look a picture when in flower and can be completely covered in white/pink blossom in the springtime.

    Hands down it is said to be the best cooking apple in the world & I personally have yet to eat

    another apple pie that beats or even comes near the Bramley....... Oh that fluffy pulp -delicious!

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