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How long does bark mulch smell of pine trees

Hi,

I've just had bark mulch delivered to put down on a children's play area and it smells really strongly of pine trees. I wondered if anybody knows how long it takes for the pine smell to go away? My son and I get headaches from pine tree and grass smells and I have got rid of the lawn but don't want to then replace it with a problematic perfume. 

Thanks!

 

JSP

Posts

  • Blue OnionBlue Onion Posts: 2,763

    Depends on the weather.  Give it a few good soakings with a hose, and let the sun/rain dissipate the smell.  The first few weeks as your kids play in the area the smell will come up again with their disturbance, but not nearly as strong.  It will still smell if you sniff a handful a month or two later, but within the year it will gone.

    Alternatively, consider artificial play mulch.  There are a variety of types.  

    Utah, USA.
  • jspjsp Posts: 59

    Hi,

    Thanks for your reply. What would you recommend in artifical play mulch? I've decided to return the bark as it is astonishingly smelly and would give both my son and myself headaches in no-time-flat. 

    Thanks so much for the comments. 

    JSP

  • Tropical SamTropical Sam Posts: 1,488

    The play area bark smells stronger than the bog standard bark and there is little difference apart from the additional price of it saying child on it. The smell, which to me is more chemical than pine tree, goes quite quickly, but very strong for a few days.

  • jspjsp Posts: 59

    Gosh! I had no idea. Oh well. image

  • Blue OnionBlue Onion Posts: 2,763

    They make some nice rubber bark chippings (ensure you purchase metal free versions).. but if it were me, I would spend the extra money and purchase quality artificial turf grass.  They make some that is soft, extremely realistic looking, and lovely for playing on.  With the artificial turf you don't have to worry about the bark blowing away/flooding away/being soiled by animals, etc.  If it's dirty you just hose it off, if the leaves get onto it in the fall you just sweep/rake them up, etc.  Super easy maintenance.  Under my own kids playground at home I have a massive sandbox.  I have boys, so they spend more time under there digging and playing than up on the swings or slide.  (And I have a Lurcher that scares off any cats that may climb over our six foot fence).  It's not that super fine sandbox sand, just washed sand used by builders, I believe.  That way it's not dusty and blowing up into their lungs.. and fine little particles are not tracked into the house.  

    Utah, USA.
  • jspjsp Posts: 59

    Thanks, those are great ideas. image

    I did have grass before but I'd accidentally bought super-fast growing grass which gave us all epic hayfever. It's really hard to totally get rid of that grass as the tiny fragments of it in the ground continually regrow. Currently I have a large area of ground under black weed supressing membrane, which is not very attractive, but does control the grass. I also get about 6 wheelbarrow loads (literally) of pears falling on to is and have to scoop them up with a snow shovel every year, so the choice of covering is really quite tricky. Thanks so much for all these ideas. I am mulling them all over and having a good think about it all. 

    Ta!

     

     

  • Blue OnionBlue Onion Posts: 2,763

    Some places will send you free artificial turf samples if you call them, just so you can actually touch and see prior to purchasing.. or smell, in your case!  

    Pea gravel looks lovely too.  Could you cover the weed membrane permanently with something visually appealing.. and then at pear falling season just stake down tarps to catch all the windfall?  They'd only be under the tree for a few weeks, and would be easy to shovel off of it a kiddy plastic snow shovel.  

    Utah, USA.
  • jspjsp Posts: 59

    I didn't know they'd send samples. I'll have a go at that. image Yes I was wondering if I could just peg down a tarpauline. It would make the pears much easier to move too. I always add most of them to the vegetable patch to enrich the soil and it makes the soil incredibly water retentive, which is a huge book in East Anglia, where the weather can be so dry. I eat a few too, of course, but 6 wheelbarrow loads a year is a lot of pears. image

    Which artificial turf would you most recommend?

     

    Thanks!

     

  • Blue OnionBlue Onion Posts: 2,763

    There is a ton to choose from.  A playground we visit frequently on trips has it installed, and it's so realistic I had to go over the first time and touch it, as I couldn't understand why it looks so nice despite the number of kids playing and running all around.  Then and there I was sold on the idea of artificial turf.. such a world away from what I had always thought of as 'typical artificial turf'.. the cheap bright green plastic beside pools.    

    http://www.synlawn.com/artificial-grass-products/playground-products/ 

    I'm in the US, and I think this is likely a US dealer.. but any search should hopefully turn up a sales rep with plenty to choose from.  I think talking with someone and telling them your needs will help you most.  

    Utah, USA.
  • jspjsp Posts: 59

    Thanks, I'll look into that. It sounds great. 

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