Forum home Plants

Help needed please with laurel hedge issues...

1232426282932

Posts

  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 4,142
    ollie3012, the removal of the fence will far better. Allows the light and wind through. In order to let them settle, try to keep them low growing by pruning out the tops if there are long spindly growth. The wind will only rip the leaves off them in the early months.
  • ollie3012ollie3012 Posts: 5
    Thanks.

    I've got the site ready but due to the corona situation the bare root laurels aren't going to be delivered until mid April. I know this isn't ideal so does anyone have any tips to help then get going... or, as a worst case, what could the problems be with later planting from bare root? Hopefully they wont die or anything?

    Thanks,
    O.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 63,947
    I would cancel and re order for next winter. I think mid April is too late for bare root laurels. 

    What do others think?
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • ollie3012ollie3012 Posts: 5
    I would cancel and re order for next winter. I think mid April is too late for bare root laurels. 

    What do others think?
    What could happen? Would they die?

    Thanks.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 63,947
    They might, depending on how they’ve been kept. If the fine roots have dried out at all they’re unlikely to survive. 
    What do others think? 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Hello all - and wishing you a safe and well bank holiday. 

    I read this 26 page forum topic last night with great enjoyment, enough to prompt me to sign up and present my own case of Laurel struggles.  

    For background, we purchased our house last year and decided to order 30 2-3ft Laurel plants from Gardening Express for £180 - we planted them in the front garden in an 'L' shape (late September) to provide some privacy from the road and our semi-detached neighbours. 

    Unfortunately, 60% of them are dying or already dead and we've absolutely no idea why. When compared to the other 40% which are coming on nicely and probably due a cut. They are planted in the same soil, and received the same care. They have lost all leaves, turned brown and feel brittle. The scratch test also shows no green. Could they have been a bad batch?

    Our neighbours grow strawberries in their front garden on the other side of the wall - could this be having any impact instead? 

    Keen to get your thoughts and advice - should I order another replacement batch (assuming they are well and truly lifeless)?

    As an aside, and to come a little later - we are looking for some inspiration in our back garden to plants along the fence line. I'll come onto that a little later in the forum :smile:

    Thank you all in advance!

    Pictures: 


  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 34,310
    Hi @anthony.harvey I'd say they've possibly suffered from drought. They're very close to the grass too. That doesn't help with establishment.
    The ones that are failing are also in a different aspect from the ones against the wall. That will make a difference. Sun and wind dry soil out.

    Were these bare root or potted? Were they moist when you got them? Did you soak them well before and after planting?

    The strawberries will have had no effect.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Fairygirl said:
    Hi @anthony.harvey I'd say they've possibly suffered from drought. They're very close to the grass too. That doesn't help with establishment.
    The ones that are failing are also in a different aspect from the ones against the wall. That will make a difference. Sun and wind dry soil out.

    Were these bare root or potted? Were they moist when you got them? Did you soak them well before and after planting?

    The strawberries will have had no effect.  :)
    Hi @Fairygirl, thank you for the response. 

    One thing I should have mentioned in my original post was that we suffered a heck of a lot of rain post-planting and at one point they were sat in a small but continued puddle of water. I was actually expecting them to have possibly drowned, not the opposite. 

    They were also wind affected so perhaps that's another contributor? 

    We received no instructions with the plants sadly, but Google did lead us to soak them before planting. They were also potted. 

    Do you believe I now need to invest in another batch? I can easily move the grass line further away too. 

    Thanks,
    Anthony
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 34,310
    I think it would certainly help if you could take another strip of soil away. Laurel does get big - in every direction, so it'll shade out the grass anyway.
    The effects of over watering can also be the same as underwatering - which can make things tricky!
    Laurel does soak up a lot of water though, and that shouldn't have caused a problem as such, but if the plants were already a bit iffy, it could have been enough to set them right back. Wind damage however, may have been a problem, but there should still be a bit of life in them if that's the case.
    Were they a bit pot bound when you got them? It's always good to tease the roots out a bit before planting, and some plants will have been in the same pots for too long a time, which makes them a bit vulnerable.
    Bearing in mind the very dry summer again, many potted plants will also have struggled to stay hydrated. Once they dry out, they need submerged totally until all the air bubbles have ceased. 
    I would also try emailing the company, but a word of warning - that company has had some very poor feedback. They'll probably say that because the others are ok, it's something you've done - or not done.  :/
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 2,609
    @anthony.harvey , if you're replanting, I suggest putting them further away from the wall (half the final width of the hedge, and more if you'll need to get between the wall and the hedge to trim it. Otherwise they'll be overhanging next door's garden in no time and you (or they) will be forever cutting it back (and the roots will spread too). Strawberries won't hurt your laurels, but your hedge will affect whatever your neighbour grows on the other side when it gets bigger.
Sign In or Register to comment.