Happy Easter - know your bunnies

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  • StagbeetleStagbeetle Posts: 174

    Cute pic Tootles image

  • YviestevieYviestevie Kingswinford, West MidlandsPosts: 4,874

    Dove if I had my way you would be head honcho at the League of Nations.  You always seem to find the exact words to say to difuse any situation.  image

    Hubby always wanted a dog when he was little but his mum wouldn't have one in the house.  One day his dad said he had got him a rabbit as a pet and he could keep it outside.  Not the sharpest tool in the box his dad had actally got him a hare.  It was huge and eventually escaped and jumped the fence.  He worked his way up the whole street of gardens stripping all the vegetation as he went, thing was he never ate a thing in his dad's garden.

    Hi from Kingswinford in the West Midlands
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 57,151
    GemmaJF wrote (see)
    Dovefromabove wrote (see)

     

    To move back to the Easter Bunny - he was totally unknown to me as a child.  This is a very interesting article http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/belief/2011/apr/23/easter-pagan-roots

     

    That seems like a bit of a biased an inaccurate article there Dove. There are literally hundreds of links to the 'Easter Bunny' in Celtic tradition, of course in different guises, the most obvious belonging to the Lutherans who had the 'hare' as a the symbol, he was a bit like Father Christmas, and would judge if the children had been good or bad.

    It was the linking of the Easter Bunny with bringing Easter Eggs which I think is valid to say was later and probably derived in the US  in the 18th century from German immigrants. This is the 'Osterhase' but both elements  have much deeper and long traditional roots in Celtic (or pagan if the term must be used) tradition. Clearly though the immigrants were bringing with them long held beliefs and traditions.

    Happy 'Eastertide'. image

     

     

    Which is why I thought it was interesting image  I've been talking recently with a German friend on a Food Forum about Easter traditions image  

    It seems too easy to dismiss the connection - apart from anything else, the visible presence of the hare at this time of year more than at any other time would surely lead to a connection with Eostre - and of course the use of the term 'modern' in the article is disingenuous - there's modern (as opposed to pre, ancient and early history)  and then there's modern image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 57,151
    Yviestevie wrote (see)

    Dove if I had my way you would be head honcho at the League of Nations.  You always seem to find the exact words to say to difuse any situation....  image

    .

    LOL Yvie, try telling my family that - if only people would listen - it's so much easier when it's written image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • GemmaJFGemmaJF Posts: 1,197
    Dovefromabove wrote (see)
    GemmaJF wrote (see)
    Dovefromabove wrote (see)

     

    To move back to the Easter Bunny - he was totally unknown to me as a child.  This is a very interesting article http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/belief/2011/apr/23/easter-pagan-roots

     

    That seems like a bit of a biased an inaccurate article there Dove. There are literally hundreds of links to the 'Easter Bunny' in Celtic tradition, of course in different guises, the most obvious belonging to the Lutherans who had the 'hare' as a the symbol, he was a bit like Father Christmas, and would judge if the children had been good or bad.

    It was the linking of the Easter Bunny with bringing Easter Eggs which I think is valid to say was later and probably derived in the US  in the 18th century from German immigrants. This is the 'Osterhase' but both elements  have much deeper and long traditional roots in Celtic (or pagan if the term must be used) tradition. Clearly though the immigrants were bringing with them long held beliefs and traditions.

    Happy 'Eastertide'. image

     

     

    Which is why I thought it was interesting image  I've been talking recently with a German friend on a Food Forum about Easter traditions image  

    It seems too easy to dismiss the connection - apart from anything else, the visible presence of the hare at this time of year more than at any other time would surely lead to a connection with Eostre - and of course the use of the term 'modern' in the article is disingenuous - there's modern (as opposed to pre, ancient and early history)  and then there's modern image

    Absolutely Dove, my comment was only meant as criticism of the poorly researched agenda journalism we seem to be subjected to these days.

    Easter Bunny (Hare), Easter Bonnets, Easter Eggs, Easter Chicks, all as pagan as Christmas Trees, Robins, Holly, Mistletoe and Yule logs. image I wonder what that journalist would write to explain away the 'Maypole' imageimage

    I've spent many years studying Celtic belief structures, I know several 'Wiccans', but your point about seeing the hare is what it is all about, one only has to look to see what people were linking together. I wonderful celebration of life returning after the death of winter. Then very naturally later linked to the resurrection of Christ.I think any of us close to the earth, whatever our chosen religions, get a good healthy dose of the 'old ways'. image

     

  • flumpy1flumpy1 Posts: 3,114

    Happy Easter Tootles

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  • 1Runnybeak11Runnybeak1 Posts: 8,503

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    This is Ester a gift from my OH years ago. She is sitting on my EAster tablecloth that I use for EAster tea-time.   The first picture is of 'Sweet Pea, she lives on my dresser. 

    HAPPY EASTER EVERYONE.   I love Bunnies. image

  • flumpy1flumpy1 Posts: 3,114

    Awe they are so cute image

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