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Garlic

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  • WelshonionWelshonion Posts: 3,114
    If the ground isn't frozen they can go straight in the garden. I find their green shoots so cheering in the winter months. The cloves from the outside of the bulb will give the greatest return, I find.



    As to the soft bulb; it will be fine if it is starting to throw up green shoots and there is no mould around the bottom of the cloves. There should be roots starting to grow, instead.
  • WelshonionWelshonion Posts: 3,114
    Dove, WUM?????
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 73,699

    Don't think so WO image  But people only know what they know - they don't know what it is they don't know - and there's loads of bandwagons out there charging around banging drums - people are quite understandably concerned when they read some stuff that I've seen - I'm not a fan of Monsanto - but I think one has to look for empirical evidence rather than take notice of scaremongering - and throwaway remarks about supermarkets contaminating soil have to be challenged or we could have the gardening equivalent of what happened when The War of the Worlds was first broadcast - the internet has huge potential for such things!

    image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • GemmaJFGemmaJF Posts: 2,286

    I would plant them up janetclaire and see what happens. I have Solent White and they are growing really well. I went for indoor planting as my soil is clay and I won't be able to do anything with it for a while yet.

  • GemmaJFGemmaJF Posts: 2,286

    I think Dove the original comment was 'I wouldn't put it past them' this isn't a statement of fact, it is an opinion that the poster wouldn't be surprised if they used some underhand tactic. An opinion I would share. 

    Have you seen the current campaign that urban grown crops are all contaminated and people should go back to buying from the supermarkets? Who's paying for that I wonder??

    I am deeply suspicious of the supermarkets and it is based on the evidence rather than imagination. I would put absolutely nothing past them. That doesn't mean I need to qualify my feeling with scientific papers, it is just a statement that I have totally lost trust in the food industry. image

    While we are nattering though, do you know why 'fresh' carrots from the supermarket don't keep? I thought it was because they were washed but my garden ones keep for a good few weeks even after washing. One of the reasons I started to grow my own was the waste. I would buy carrots from the supermarket, if they were not eaten within a week they literally disintegrated, even if kept in the bottom of the fridge. I don't know why this is but it makes me think they are doing something to them we don't know about but should.

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 73,699

    I've not seen the campaign re contamination of urban grown crops, but I am aware that there is a not insignificant number of inner city gardens, particularly those on former brownfield sites that show contamination (particularly lead) and I would really think twice about eating veg grown in them.  There are also gardens which have had such a large amount of dog and cat faeces on them that I wouldn't garden in them.

    I've not had a problem with supermarket carrots keeping - I buy carrots from various supermarkets and our local farm shop and occasionally get given a bag by farming brother.  We keep them in the garage in the winter and in the bottom of the fridge in the summer for weeks at a time and the only time I've ever had any go slimy was when they were left in a plastic bag. 

     

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • GemmaJFGemmaJF Posts: 2,286

    Maybe it is a local thing with the carrots, I've talked to my neighbours about it and they agree that the carrots from our local supermarkets have a habit of of mysteriously disintegrating! I always took them out of the bags and placed them dry in the bottom of the fridge in summer and out in our unheated utility room in the winter. I do love a mystery,  it makes me wonder though if something is done to them to make sure we have to buy fresh ones every week.... image

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 73,699

    Sometimes if the carrots have been over-irrigated they have a poorer keeping quality. It's a fine judgement to irrigate enough to keep them growing and yet not too much to impact on the quality, especially when on light soil in a dry season.  The same goes for potatoes.

    Brother says if his carrots didn't keep the supermarkets wouldn't take them and he'd be left with  carrots that would have to go for animal feed 

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • GemmaJFGemmaJF Posts: 2,286

    That's interesting Dove, I had thought perhaps it was a storage thing that caused it, hadn't thought it could go right back to the growing conditions. So perhaps our local Supermarkets are buying in sub-standard carrots others would reject.

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 73,699

    Last year was very dry in some areas, especially on the light land which is best for growing carrots.  It takes a lot of experience and expertise to get the irrigation regime right in those conditions.  Are the supermarket carrots you buy bagged with the ID of the grower on them?

    Just spoke to my brother again (re elderly parents) and he went on to say, re carrots - sometimes they are overwintered in the ground covered with straw and black plastic and if the ground is very dry when they are covered they can get a bit dried out which would make them a little soft - however he said that none of the major supermarkets would accept them if they are soft.

    He said that the rules and requirements the producers have to follow are incredibly strict and they are checked and audited so stringently - he believes that the food he produces is just as safe as any organic food - as he said, he feeds it to his family image

    He pointed out that organic potato growers are allowed to use copper sulphate to help prevent blight whereas non-organic growers are not allowed to use it because of it's toxological effects .

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







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