Swiss Chard

I have been wading through the seed catalogues and have never tried growing or indeed eating Swiss Chard. Tried Asparagus Peas last year - disastrous as predicted by many of you. Is Swiss Chard worth a go - If so which one - T & M recommend the yellow one for sweetness cooked and the red one for salads - A mystery to me but I always like to try something new.

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  • PalustrisPalustris Posts: 3,199

    Us too. Rainbow Chard gives you the choice of colours.

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,759

    More huge chard fans here - it crops for ever and stand through most winters too. 

    I usually make two or three successional sowings which gives us at least one meal  a week for about 8 months of the year  - in the summer we eat it at least every other day.  Great in a stir fry and also in a quiche as well as cooking it like spinach - and we cook the thick stems separately like asparagus.  

    I've tried most varieties but now still to the Swiss Chard 'Lucullus' http://www.thompson-morgan.com/vegetables/vegetable-seeds/beetroot-and-chard-seeds/leaf-beet-lucullus/593TM good yield and fantastic flavour. image

    Wouldn't be without it!

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • ginagibbsginagibbs Posts: 756

    Found it easy to grow, just dont like the tasteimage, perhaps I am cooking it wrong?

  • Lupin 1Lupin 1 Posts: 8,916

    Rainbow chard fan here image

  • Busy-LizzieBusy-Lizzie Posts: 14,259

    Like Edd, I prefer the white one. Ginagibbs, there are 2 tastes if you do it like Dove - leaves like spinach, stems separately with butter or hollandaise sauce.

    Dordogne and Norfolk
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,759
    Edd wrote (see)

    Have you tried growing baby Swiss chard indoors in containers or pots dove? Lots of baby greens in about a fortnight.image


    We don't have a greenhouse Edd, but when we sow our chard we sow quite thickly and use the thinnings as baby greens.  We also sow it thickly in patches in a raised bed with other salad leaves in the spring to cut and come again.

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Zoomer44Zoomer44 Posts: 3,158

    Another fan, me thinks this is a really under valued veg.

    Tried growing it a few times, unsuccessfully, but rainbow chad has done really well this year. I've stopped picking it but the plants are standing up against the hardiest winter veg.  

    I read somewhere chad will continue producing for up to 4yrs, no doubt the leaves will be as tuff as old boots but I'm waiting to see what they'll taste like come the spring in their second yearimage

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 19,472

    Another fan here.   The leafy bits can be eaten raw in salads or cooked like spinach but is a softer taste and doesn't coat my mouth like cooked spinach does.  The stalks are good stir fried or in quiches.  

    Easy to grow and attractive.   I've seen the red ones grown in ornamental borders with red Bishop of Llandaff dahlias, red onions, cavolo nero and red cannas.   Stunning. 

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • biofreakbiofreak Posts: 741

    Gosh what a great response! Certainly will order some now BUT does it require special attention like celery, - is it best to start it off indoors or can it be sown direct outside. I normally start all seeds off then plant out seedlings in situ. Details on packets for Chard not that clear.

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 19,472

    I sow mine direct but you could do it in modules and plant out later if you prefer.    It's hardy and a member of the beetroot family so doesn't need coddling along.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
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