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Wellies!

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  • laugh a minute - this site!

    Oh Steve - a vet with large calves - bet they were hard to deliver!

    seriously though - I can't bend my foot round the bend to get into normal wellies.  Does anyone wear shorter ankle ones, and how good are they, and who makes them?

  • WelshonionWelshonion Posts: 3,114
    Got mine from Joules. Blue and white striped.



    Also Rigger boots are good, with pull-up straps and steel toe-caps and fleecy insides.
  • I've been impressed by my Grubs Boots, which are similar to MuckBoots. They are easy to get on and off, keep my feet warm, haven't leaked yet and are purple! I used to buy cheap ones, but they didn't even last one season as a rule (I wear them every day).

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 16,145

    Joules are not wide enough for me, I bought a couple of pairs from GC 35.00 each, (not Joules) both lasted bit less than 3 months. I now have a pair of plain green ones from b&Q, they are soft wide plenty big enough to take a sheepskin inner soul and they have, so far,  lasted longer than the 2 pairs fron GC. They were 11.99. Mine always split accross the toes. 

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Another vote for muckboots from me. The tops are neoprene so like others have said, they stretch to fit your calves and also don't gape at the top so don't get soil in when digging like my others. The feet are also neoprene lined so toasty warm. I have found the soles to be fine. 

    If you have small feet (I'm a ladies size 5) you can get kids wellies much cheaper than adults (I think because you don't have to pay tax on them?). Well that's what I found with muckboots anyway.

  • Hi poddington, good to see you.

    Love my joules wellies and as welsh onion said they do ankle ones too

  • Hi SGL! Have been doing lots of lurking recently. But am passionate about my wellies so felt the need to contribute image

  • Lol poddington  image

  • I must confess to a long-term relationship with Nora wellies - it started when I moved to wet West Pembrokeshire in 1976. My role as tutor was dominated by fieldwork sessions involving 4-5 days per week working on either seaweedy seashores and/ or jumping in & out of rivers AND driving minibuses for the student groups. It would have been a quick (and expensive death) to my decent leather walking boots if subjected to immersion in seawater, so Noras were recommended by a neighbourly farmer friend. I sped to the nearby Farmers' Cooperative & bought two pairs, (one to wear and one to dry out). Result!! Those first boots* cost about £5 each pair and lasted until I wore the soles to 'racing slick' condition - over a 12 year period!

    *Their replacements were a bit more expensive, but lasted far longer as my work as a walk leader for the National Park needed walking boots far more frequently than wellies.

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