slow growing crocosmia

LunariaLunaria Posts: 144

Hello, I am new to theses forums. I have inherited a cliff top garden. Crocosmia had been used to boarder every bed. I have it everywhere. If that is not enough, i have several clump of the luicfer variety. It's all been allowed to grew rampant.  I discovered a slate path the crocosmia had grown on top of. I have been ripping it out, the best I can. But I still have it in areas of the garden I will be tackling next year. I have begun to hate the stuff. I am wanting to create a cottage garden. I often see crocosmia in pictures of cottage gardens. I must admit it does look nice. Are there any varieties that grow slowly. Mine is a very rapid grower.

Posts

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 14,137

    Welcome Lisa.

    Just dig up what you dont want, it is ramant and needs keeping in check.

    It grows very wild everywhere down here in Devon and Cornwall.

    There is a distinct difference between montbretia and crocosmia, the first pulls up very easy, the other one needs to be dug.

    I keep mine to small round clumps about 12 ot 14 inches across, then pull up anything outside that circle.

    Its a usefull plant if you have a big garden, mine is never without leaves so its lovely in the winter. Pale green shoots now about 6inches tall.

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • If you're starting to hate why not get rid of some of it and replace it with a different 'cottagey' perennial such as phlox?

    There are some less vigourous varieties such as star of the east and rowallane yellow.    I too have loads of it and have divided some for a friend as it was coming up through the path! I still like it even though I feel the red jarred with the pinks in my border this year. Though my pink phlox flowered much later. Here's a pic of it:

    image

     

  • Crikey, really? It thrives in my garden. I've a few different ones and I'm very fond of them. Our soil is quite loamy though. I think it's great as it stops the weeds and the flowers are numerous and long lasting. I'd be happy to donate some pink phlox to anyone local to coventry.

     

  • http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v693/charlie-says/Mobile%20Uploads/2014-12/3EF232C7-002F-4C07-9ABB-1D092C8DBA62.jpg

     

  • LunariaLunaria Posts: 144

    Thank you all for your replies.

    Charliebot - I shall look in to the varieties you suggest. I think I shall like the plant more when it's not in every nook and cranny of the garden.  It's also a proven grower. I am on a cliff top, very, very north of Scotland.  Finding things that will survive up here can be challenging.  I have several varies of the alpine phlox. I shall look into the larger varieties.  Your garden is beautiful.  You should be very proud. 

  • Thank you. Please update us with how you get on. image

  • lindaw53lindaw53 Posts: 1

    Regarding Crocosmia or Montbretia as my Mum used to call it, yes, it is incredibly invasive and grows so rapidly, myou just have to yank it out where you don`t want it. However, I have found that the variety `Lucifer` is very different, it is taller and the leaves are much broader;and a bit darker .I have only two of Lucifer variety and they have not spread at all;also I planted 5 bulbs a month or so ago and they are not showing at all despite being planted at the correct depth and in a sunny position. Ijust hope they do start to flourish.

  • philippa smith2philippa smith2 Posts: 7,201

    Crocosmia Lucifer are quite a different kettle of fish from the dreaded common jobs.

    Lucifer is just coming into flower now and I think you need to physically transplant ( or plant new corms ) if you want to have more than your original clump.

Sign In or Register to comment.