Forum home The potting shed

Family traits

I've never liked white cheese as a child. In my 30's I really started to enjoy white Stilton when I mentioned it at my parent's it turned out to be my paternal grandfather's favourite. 

In my teens I hated what I called soup with bits in. As an adult the only soups I don't like have pearl barley in them...I was unaware that my father hated it, maybe it was because as a child he was fed a lot of it. 

Is it just me or have others experienced similar weird things ?   Probably just me imageimage

«1

Posts

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 63,782

    I'm fighting that possibility - my son says I'm more like my delightfully batty aunt than like Ma - hope that's a good thing image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 17,221

    Oh Lord! Where to start! I see my mother in shop windows. I see her hands at the kitchen worktop holding a knife just THAT way. I see my father's varicose veins (thanks dad). I could go on but it's not a pretty pictureimage

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • GemmaJFGemmaJF Posts: 2,283

    I hated cheese when I was little, will eat most types now though. Not a change in taste as it was the consistency of it that use to put me off, not the taste.

    The family trait miracle in our family is my son. He never met my Dad who passed away young at 57, when I was 19. My son is like a carbon copy of Dad in personality, looks and outlook. image

    I think I actually try hard not to be much like my family, but I know deep down I'm slowly turning into my auntie Lilly. She always was the black sheep of the family, highly opinionated, and always out in her garden. image 

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 21,839

    Heaven forbid!!  I hope I'm more caring, more adventurous, more nurturing and kinder - and a better cook and gardener.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 16,480

    I hope not as well, and I hope when I am old and need care that I will co operate with whoever looks after me.

    I am more like my dad, he is quiet, placid, hates a fuss and crowds of people, parties, being of gypsy mother, he always loved being out doors, in those days it was scrumping veg, in later years growing it. Thats not to say we dont fight for ourselves, he was a boxing champion first for his school, then in the Navy, and at fairground.

    I was glued to my dad, he couldnt move without me. Always have been, we were great mates when I was teenage, fixing motor bikes and cars. Sunday mornings would be down scrappy, mum would want me to help in the house.

    My mum was a better cook than me, she loved messing about in the kitchen, I would rather be outside.

     

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • ClaringtonClarington Posts: 4,949

    My brother always reminds me of the milkman...

     

     

    image

  • Lupin 1Lupin 1 Posts: 8,916

    imageimage

    Thanks for your posts I thought this might be a bit of fun or die quickly onto page 10.

    Not that I like to admit but I think I am developing my dad's eyebrows imageimage

    I also had a relative named  Lily, my maternal grandma. Hence Lily of the Valley in my garden image

    She loved bottled Guinness, not draft imageimage and no other alcohol, she didn't lose her taste for it until she was 76. I don't think I take after Lily as I don't much like alcohol and am in no way opinionated or stubborn as she was(bless her) image but I do tell huge big fibs imageimageimage Cheers all ! 

  • The flip side of this is when you see your adult children turning into you....

  • Busy-LizzieBusy-Lizzie Posts: 14,853

    My children say I look more like my father but have my mother's mannerisms. I know, like KEF, that I am getting my father's eyebrows because I have to pluck his stray long hairs.

    My daughter says that when she gets in a tizz she can feel she's behaving like me and I know I behave like my mother when flustered.

    Dordogne and Norfolk
  • On a recent visit to my granny's i found my great great grandpa was a horticulturist and dedicated his life grafting. He kept a special grafting knife along with his 'go to books' and journals and these have been given to me as i too wish to follow this path. Turns out his name was George Peck and had his grafting knife engraved with his initials which are the same as mine. Quite creepy but comforting! On the same trip i was given a ficus benjamina weeping fig from my great grandfather on my mother's side!

    Must be in the blood!

Sign In or Register to comment.