Anyone grow globe artichokes...

Zoomer44Zoomer44 Posts: 3,155

After saying I wasn't going to grow globe artichokes, several weeks ago I picked up 12 plants from the nearly dead section of a store at a rock bottom bargin price and not really thinking they would grow planted them out, 1 died but the rest have florished.

I'm not sure what to do with them now, will the crowns need protection over winter? Should the leaves be cut back and crowns mulched?

Thanks in advance for your replies... 

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  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 16,209

    I grew Vert de Laon from seed one year. They did OK until they met a Derbyshire winter. I put a thick mulch on them, as advised, but didn't notice that the slugs had moved in and eaten the lot.

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • hi zoomer, i grow globe artichokes as ornimentals, i dont know where you live, but im in the west mids, in a reletively sheltered spot, i dont mulch them, or do anything  at all really, they seem farly tough.

    on saying that, it cant do any harm to protect them a bit,as they are babies. maybe a bit of fleece would be enough, are they still in pots? i would be more worried about them getting soggy than cold. 

    good luckimage

  • Zoomer44Zoomer44 Posts: 3,155

    I'm in the NW and they are in the ground.

    Think I will try mulching them, it won't do any harm if checked for slugs and I've some straw which would probably do nicely.   

  • I grew globle artichokes and left them in for 2 years before harvesting.  They grew to about 10feet and I harvested them at the end of July before they produced flowers.  The were very hardnand full of hairs inside but no fruit.  Are there decorative and edible fruits and did I plant the wrong sort?

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,582

    Have you cooked globe artichokes before Jean?  There's quite a knack to preparing them to avoid the hairy 'choke' and get the best out of them. 

    For anyone who's not sure what to do with them, here's a very good video explaining it all http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/technique/how-prepare-globe-artichokes 

    image

     

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • scigibscigib Posts: 51

    I have planted 5. They are growing v well. My allotment neighbour has a line of 5 as well and his thrive on neglect. They are dramatic plants and he has harvested his crowns this year and he said the were amazing. He uses straw to cover in the winter he puts round a temp wall and fills the space up.

  • Zoomer44Zoomer44 Posts: 3,155

    I've 6 plants which survived winter but not all grown fruit this yr. One was ready to crop late June. I picked when they were just slightly bigger then golf ball size. I'm leaving what is left to flower.

     

    They were still very tender inside after steaming and the centre wasn't really hairy but tender green. A sharp knife is needed  to top and tail before cooking and scissors to snip the tips.

    I'd advise to pick when small.

  • I used to grow them and waited until the heads were about the size of a grapefruit!  The way we used to cook & eat them is as follows:-

    Trim off the first few outer "petals", cut off the stem at the base of the "head" and boil the whole heads in slightly salted water with a dash of lemon juice.  Need a huge saucepan!  You can tell when they're ready when you can easily push the sharp end of a paring knife into the base of the stem. Remove from the pan and leave the cooked artichokes upside down to drain for a little while.

    Eating them is a bit messy - I have some plates which are designed to cope with it all - you pull off each "petal" and dip it into melted seasoned butter before scraping the fleshy part off between your teeth.  The plates have a small shallow "well" for the melted butter, and the edge of the plate looks like petals, so you put the scraped ones there.  Continue scraping/eating until you get to the "choke", which you discard.  The best part of the whole artichoke is the middle bit below the choke - called the "heart" - cut this into smallish pieces & enjoy!

    My D has fond memories of eating them as a child and was disappointed when she and her children visited the UK again this year because she wanted my grandchildren to try them and I don't grow them any more - neither could I find any to buy anywhere.

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,582
    hypercharleyfarley wrote (see)

    I used to grow them and waited until the heads were about the size of a grapefruit!  The way we used to cook & eat them is as follows:-

    Trim off the first few outer "petals", cut off the stem at the base of the "head" and boil the whole heads in slightly salted water with a dash of lemon juice.  Need a huge saucepan!  You can tell when they're ready when you can easily push the sharp end of a paring knife into the base of the stem. Remove from the pan and leave the cooked artichokes upside down to drain for a little while.

    Eating them is a bit messy - I have some plates which are designed to cope with it all - you pull off each "petal" and dip it into melted seasoned butter before scraping the fleshy part off between your teeth.  The plates have a small shallow "well" for the melted butter, and the edge of the plate looks like petals, so you put the scraped ones there.  Continue scraping/eating until you get to the "choke", which you discard.  The best part of the whole artichoke is the middle bit below the choke - called the "heart" - cut this into smallish pieces & enjoy! .......

    I must admit hat's we way we usually have them - saves all the faff of preparing them prior to cooking, and is a pleasant way of passing an evening, with lots of napkins and a bottle of very crisp Sauv blanc image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • chris 172chris 172 Posts: 403

    hi i planted seeds this year and have just recently planted them in their positions. i have 18 plants but planted 12 i have a large allotment.  i am not going to take any fruit this year however i have been advised they will come great next year and the plants are really healthy.  cover them with straw/fleece end of season and await their growthnext year.

    look forward to using them as i love anti pasto and intend to put some in garlic and preserve happy gardening

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