Wartime Farm

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  • Frank, it is really interesting to read your posts alongside the programmes. I have always watched these recreation projects with the thought that they can only present a partial view  of what it was actually like to Iive through the times.I hope you will continue to post as the series progresses image  

     

  • Jellyjam wrote (see)

    Frank, it is really interesting to read your posts alongside the programmes. I have always watched these recreation projects with the thought that they can only present a partial view  of what it was actually like to Iive through the times.I hope you will continue to post as the series progresses image  

     

     

    I do so agree with you, Jellyjam.

    I'm no spring chicken myself, and do have some childhood memories of the late forties onwards. I know enough to know that Frank's accounts are accurate &  do compliment the program admirably.

  • Jellyjam wrote (see)

    Frank, it is really interesting to read your posts alongside the programmes. I have always watched these recreation projects with the thought that they can only present a partial view  of what it was actually like to Iive through the times.I hope you will continue to post as the series progresses image  

     

    Jellyjam We found that out with the other programmes Edwardian and Victorian Farm, they can only represent facets. At least this time they are not making blatant mistakes it is far better researched.
    There were reams of paper dished out to any one producing food of any sort which in a country area would be most, rules are meant to be broken or in Dad's case slightly dented, when Mother late for her war-work took the Austen chummy car after making me start it (a bit like the one on the show only a two seater) she who had no licence and as far as I knew no lessons got herself in trouble. When the local Bobby duly arrived he and Dad had a long talk up the garden they came back and Mum was told do not do that again as he left with a large packet of Bacon in his pocket. Even a dead straight bat played off the side at times.
    I will comment on what I know though it would appear different parts of the country reacted in different ways to suit their needs.
    Ruth's stew looked good to me with some some freshly made farm bread.

    Frank.

  • (In case Frank & DK think I've not seen any of the programmes!)  -   I finally got around to watching Episode 1 on i-player last night, after I'd seen the second episode.  As Frank says, it looks as though they've done a bit more research this time - though (to me at least) there are  still mistakes which make me want to throw something at the TV - part of the script last night seemed (I thought) to infer that barley had been more commonly used for bread-making than wheat.  I don't think that's the case.  The sileage-making attempt was dire..........people would have been much more likely to try to line a pit/clamp with the corrugated iron rather than stand it on top of the ground - and as for how they pitchforked the greenstuff into it - well...............talk about passing the furniture in through a window whilst the front door's open.......................  I see that Ruth still can't find the nailbrush - and she hasn't looked at any of the ample film footage of the war years in order to learn how to tie & wear what we called "a turban".  I agree with Frank when he says that the kitchen range wouldn't have gone out, so there'd have been no need for the paraffin stove in a farm kitchen.  Portable paraffin room heaters for elsewhere in the house maybe....

    I suppose they had fun trying to make that mole plough - but I'd like to have seen what the blacksmith's own version would have been.  Without some sort of brace + a whole lot more weight it was never going to work, was it?  Considering this was supposed to be the early part of the war and farmers wouldn't yet have got used to having The Land Army around (and therefore seeing women doing things on the farm that were always hitherto considered "Men's Work") I was surprised to see Ruth driving the tractor at this stage of the series. 

    I suppose I'd have to say "improved, but could do better" if you asked me how I thought the two programmes so far compare with the previous series - but it does irritate me when I see things in the background that I know weren't around then - that coach-built pram was much later than 1940 I reckon, ditto the sort of hay-bale I saw one chap carrying. 

    Frank's version of how things really were is, as always, well worth reading.  Thanks, Frank!

  • Hello Ma, wondered where you were.
    We have to make allowances as they try to generalise what was quite a varied often totally different trade as you moved from County to County. We moved from Hill farming sheep to Dairy farming on land that a couple of feet down would have produced brick clay to a General farm, each was a different technique and set up.
    The we being my Mothers very close Aunt and Uncle, I spent a lot of time on those farms learning the hard way.
    Our own smallholding could have been called a small farm and we all had to work at our own jobs from being able to hold a fork and muck out, you are right about that the handling compared with the land girls slinging hay onto the waggon was a bit diabolical.
    In this part of the country you could get oat cakes and some went into Linseed oil cattle cake, some would go to the malting's.
    We should allow for some things differing and cannot expect them to handle the tools they did not grow up with, tea tonight was a hot pot, Ruth must have put her fluence on me last night, it was slow cooked and delicious, the sliced potato on top well coated with butter done to a turn, what are we having next week Ruth?

    Frank.

  • Hello, Ma...so  pleased to hear your input.

    As I said earlier, I was still a tot during the mid 40s, but was well aware of things around me. I do recall that heavy horses were the main source of muscle on farms (little mechanisation) in my village.

    I do have happy memories of helping the lady from our local dairy deliver milk from a churn & metal jug with a long handle from a pony & trap.

    Also visiting farms on threshing-day with an old uncle on his AJS motor cycle & sidecar, to collect chaff for the chickens.

  • Watched One Man and his Dog last night, the other half is on tonight, it used to run over several weeks but I suppose it is a niche sport. The sheep were a right bolshy lot one ewe faced down the dog and stamped her foot, the body language was "watch it mate" and they could not get them to flow, we will see what happens tonight then.
    Ma, for some reason it brought back memories of the Creamery at the Farm, Aunt Mabel made all her own cream and butter and the vision of that cool room half tiled with the long bench of flat bowls of cream with muslin cages over them was quite vivid for some reason. It reminded me of the buttermilk that went into the cooking when all the women filled the kitchen with bread scones and cakes during Harvest and other get togethers, I preferred the milk straight from the churn full fat and creamy, oh and warm.
    Funny such bright memories yet? yet, "err" what day is it?

    Frank.

  •  

    I thought last nights show was “Arts and crafts” plus Strictly come dancing badly. Wartime farming was hardly mentioned apart from “tackin tauld sow t boar”, we did that. As for tile making we had one of the biggest tile and brick makers in the country less than five miles away, they were in full production all the war and after leaving massive holes in the country side digging the clay.

    The bit that upset me and brought back memories long suppressed was the “Evacuee story” Ruth making bed frames and Huts turned into dormitories may have happened in the South where the City's took a pasting up North no. and nobody asked the kids.

    My Sister and I were what was known as paid for evacuees, Mother and Father went into the countryside and found someone willing to take us for money and there by hangs a tale which I will write and post on here if it is of interest to anyone.

    Frank.

  • Yes Frank I would be very interested. I was born at the end of the war so have no recollection of war time, I only know what I have been told by my parents, grandparents and what I have learnt from books, tv etc. I wish I had asked more questions at the time when I could have got personal answers.Too late now, as my Mum is 99 and can remember some things but gets a bit confused, she is the only family member who is still with us that lived as an adult through the war..

    I didn't realise we imported so much food, I wonder what the percentage of imports is now?

    ChrisX

  • I'd be interested too, Frank.....As it happens I married an evacuee girl from our village (51 years ago) who never returned to her mother (father deceased) in London after the war ended.

    Incidentally, this was because she formed such a strong bond with her adoptive parents (she was only three when taken in) and wouldn't be parted from them....something about  'Goodnight Mister Tom' about her story.

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