Screening my fence with a hedge

I have just had 4 leylanddis cut down at the bottom of my garden - I did feel guilty but as they had grown quite wide there was a narrow gap between them and my greenhouse and I no longer felt safe climbing a ladder and balancing over glass with a hedge trimmer.  However I would like to plant some sort of evergreen hedging which doesn't grow out too wide and that I can keep at a height of 8 foot.  Please could I have some suggestions.  I really don't like that shrub that a lot of people have in their front gardens as hedging and it smells really horrible as you pass it especially in summer and at this time of the year.  I don't know what it is called but I'm sure you will know the one I mean.  Anything else fast growing would be good.  The fence it is screening is not mine so I don't want to attach anything to it.  I did have blackbirds nesting in the leylanddi so would like to keep the birds in my garden.

Thanks

 

Posts

  • Busy-LizzieBusy-Lizzie Posts: 13,683

    My son planted an Eleagnus which worked pretty well. It's evergreen. Planting after leylandii you would have to enrich the soil with compost or rotted manure and dig it in. Here is a link to a hedging firm, I'm not intending to advertise them but their site has a lot of information about hedges. http://www.hedgesdirect.co.uk/acatalog/oleaster.html

    Dordogne and Norfolk
  • We had a hedge 3 Meters high and needed cutting twice a year of  escallonia , it is evergreen has a small pink flower and the foliage has a wonderful smell of pineapple. Bees like it too.

  • hogweedhogweed Central ScotlandPosts: 3,932

    How big is the gap between the fence and your greenhouse? Most hedging plants will be quite wide if you want them at 8 feet. You may have to resort to leylandii again and keep shaving the sides every year.  Yew may be a bit 'thinner' but is fairly slow growing.

    'Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement' - Helen Keller
  • sjpsjp Posts: 19

    Thank you all for the ideas.

    The gap between the fence and the greenhouse is about 3 foot so I am quite keen to make sure I don't let anything creep in again.  I must admit that it is a lot lighter around there.  I didn't realise how dark those leylanii had made the area and they were only about 9' high.

  • hogweedhogweed Central ScotlandPosts: 3,932

    Three foot is not a lot if you need to squeeze in to cut the hedge. Maybe give it a few weeks to see if you can live without one?

    'Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement' - Helen Keller
  • sjpsjp Posts: 19

    You have got a point.  It would be very nice to not have to worry about cutting it back all the time.  At least I have the winter to get used to it.

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 17,052

    If the fence is in good nick you don't need a hedge but, if you really want to disguise it and have smething green, think about erecting a few fence posts and trellis panels inside it and growing a range of climbers that will attract insects and birds.

    You will need to do a lot to improve the soil first but could then go for pyracantha which is very wildlife friendly having blossom, berries and evergreen leaves or climbing roses, honeysuckle, clematis...........

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • sjpsjp Posts: 19

    The reason we had the hedge originally was before we had a greenhouse and there had been an old apple tree in the garden behind mine which blew down in some strong winds.  Then my garden was completely overlooked hence the leylandii.  Now there are some sort of things that look like bamboo canes at the bottom of there garden so it isn't that overlooked anymore.  Its just me trying to get used to looking at a plain fence I suppose!  Having said that I do have some honeysuckle which I could encourage to go that way and I will certainly look up those plants you suggest.  Thanks. 

    ps. I love the comments about Wisteria - I take it you are not a fan?

  • Busy-LizzieBusy-Lizzie Posts: 13,683

    I love Wisteria but it isn't suitable for a wooden fence, nor is Hydrangea Petiolaris. I have both on a wall of the house and they are as big as each other.

    It's hard to see exactly what you mean, though, without a photo.

    Dordogne and Norfolk
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