Moving Raspberries & Goosberries

Hi all,

I have ordered some plants and need to move my autumn fruiting raspberries and gooseberries within the next couple of weeks.

I realise this is probably the wrong time to move them but will they survive and is there anything I can do to help them once I have moved them.

Thanks in advance.

Ilka image

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Posts

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,430

    Prepare the new site well, cut the raspberries back to knee height and they'll be fine. Then cut them right down in Feb.

    And the gooseberries shouldn't come to any harm if you move them with a large rootball - slide it onto a sheet of plastic and drag it across the ground so the rootball doesn't break up. 

    I'm going to be moving some autumn raspberries and gooseberries very soon too image

    I'll give them a good mulching with well-rotted farmyard manure after I've moved them and they should be right as rain.

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • IlksIlks Posts: 11

    Thank you, that's great advice.  I have bought some bags of manure for mulch. Should I prune the gooseberries now or leave them?

    I am hoping to grow some redcurrants, blackcurrants, blackberries and summer fruiting raspberries in pots.  Do you have any advice for these. I have just bought out most of B & Q's supply of John Innes No.3 so hopefully they should be off to a good start!

    I may have bitten off more than I can chew but I hope not image

  • Fishy65Fishy65 Posts: 2,230

    Regarding your first question Ilks - I moved a young gooseberry bush just a few weeks ago because it was too close to a new pond I've dug. Its doing very well in it's new spot image

  • IlksIlks Posts: 11

    Thanks Fishy I shall move my fruit without fear image

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,430
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,430

    I agree Verdun - hadn't thought of that - I was relating the situation to my own. image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • IlksIlks Posts: 11

    Hi again,

    They are around three years old if I remember rightly, my mum planted them and I have taken over since she passed away image

    Thanks for thee great advice guys, really helpful image

  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 8,240

    You may as well give yourself a bit of insurance by planting the prunings when you do that.  I find they root very easily even just sticking them (half buried) in the ground!

    image

    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • IlksIlks Posts: 11

    Yes I did wonder about that, do they have to be new growth or old please Bob?

    image

     

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