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grass cuttings

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  • PalustrisPalustris Posts: 3,421

    Palaisglide, as I said grass cuttings go anaerobic if just left, turned and or aerated they compost just fine.

  • PalaisglidePalaisglide Posts: 3,414

    Berghill, in my experience no they don't, we were all volunteer groundsmen for our bowling club and so we tried all ways to compost the cuttings and still had to bag and get rid of a pile of black goo.

    Frank.

  • jatnikapyarjatnikapyar Posts: 419

    Hi, I have been using grass cuttings for years as mulch under trees and as a weed supressant. yes it does go mushy and slimey but if it is spread thin it soon disappears and even weakens bind weed and dock and dandilion. it works ok in the compost bins too if spread thin  and mixed with other plant matter and uric acid, as suggested by others or use grotter.I compost most of my green waste and find the compost very useful. I have noticed lately that not only is bought compost pricy but some brands are not as good as my own and have bits of wood etc. in it.Besides, I resent sending anything (except stuff that takes ages to compost, i.e.rose prunings etc.) as they don't even give us FREE compost.It is a cheek considering that we pay council tax and get an inferior service from them.

  • PalustrisPalustris Posts: 3,421

    Then, Palaisglide I do not know what you were doing, almost all of my grass cuttings go onto our compost heap and they make up the vast bulk of it and rot down within the normal length of time into usuable compost. Our neighbour puts his grass over the fence into the farmer's field behind and I noticed to day that it has rotted away into usuable stuff.

  • PalaisglidePalaisglide Posts: 3,414

    Yes indeed Berghill I too put some on my own compost spread thinly and mixed with plenty of other material, I turn it often so it gets air and being large wooden structures plenty of heat. If I go a bit mad and add too much I find when turning the heap the grass is still in a layer and have to break it up.
    The bowling club grass did not have the mix, even when we tried turning and getting some air in it did not work. We added the trimmings from the surrounding hedges and that did not work so it went into bins and sent to the green-waste. We live and learn and up here on the North East Coast we have to work at getting heat into the compost.

    Frank.

  • PalustrisPalustris Posts: 3,421

    It is a shame really, throwing away material which could be turned into usable stuff and then having to buy it back again. image

    I sometimes think the amount of work involved in turning grass in to compost is not worth the effort for the amount one gets. 12 months worth produces a few cubic feet of it and a lot of back ache!

    Mind it would take a few bin loads to get rid of even one mowing of our paths so the choice is not really there. image

    And if this rain does not stop there is going to be even more of it, nothing else is growing as it should, but boy is the grass.

  • PalaisglidePalaisglide Posts: 3,414

    The story of compost Berghill is knowing when to stop. I do not have a shredder so heavy stuff goes to the green-waste they put everything through a huge shredder and mixer, pile it high and turn it often.
    My two large boxes with lids to keep the heat in fill quickly enough without the grass cuttings so it does not bother me too much and we can have a bag of compost per week from the green-waste free.
    This week some woody gone over plants were mixed with some of as you say fast growing grass and dead headings, a drop of the magic mix from the garage sprinkled on and it is away, using one box whilst filling another turning the new box into the barrow and tossing it back keeps it aerated and heating.
    In Autumn all the old potting soil gets mixed in as well then left all winter for lovely compost in the spring, usually my summer compost takes around six weeks this year probably six months?

    Frank.

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