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Sweet William

Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 11,286

My Sweet William gave a great display this year (planted May 2013). I cut them right back after flowering and they are sprouting again from around the base already to around 6" of bright green healthy growth

As it's a biennial will I get much of a show if I keep them for next year?

If so, I'd like to move them (they were labelled as annual dianthus....) when would be the best time?

They self-seeded freely so I've got 36 little-uns ready to grow on

Thanks


Billericay - Essex

Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.

Posts

  • Forester2Forester2 Posts: 1,477

    Mine always seem to flower again the following year.  You could try moving them in the autumn.  They are smashing plants and I wouldn't be without them now.

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 11,286

    Thanks both.

    I'll leave them until I can decide what to replace them with as they're in the wrong place anyway right by the grass and the mower sometimes goes for them......

    Will basal cuttings work from the new growth? There's some ideal cutting material.


    Billericay - Essex

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Forester2Forester2 Posts: 1,477

    Sometimes for the second years growth they can get 'leggy' at the  ground level but I just push that growth to where I want it and pile soil over the thin leggy bit (still attached to the main plant) and it seems OK the following year.  Not sure if you can do cuttings - must look that up.

  • Forester2Forester2 Posts: 1,477

    Just checked - yes, you can do cuttings with new non flowering growth.  Pot up into individual pots and they will root fairly quickly.

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 11,286

    Nice one! Thanks Forester2 - I'll do that in the morning.


    Billericay - Essex

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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