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So what should we be doing with our grass right now?

Hi All,

Grass in here in Norwich is starting to get quite parched with brown bits. What does everyone here do? Leave well alone and let it sort itself out, or water, if so what criteria do you wait for and then how much how often?

This particular patch is south facing with no shade so gets sun all day long.

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  • nutcutletnutcutlet Posts: 27,414

    I don't do anything. It goes brown,  it rains, in goes green.

    It depends what you want  a LAWN or a patch of grass for the kids to play on.



    In the sticks near Peterborough
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 87,836

    I'm near to Norwich and our front lawn (west facing) is a delightful shade of cardboard.

    To apply enough water often enough to make a difference would cost a fortune (we're metered) and be unethical  in my opinion.  I'll happily water our veg - I'll even water the flowerbeds and shrubs because they will die without water and they cost me a lot of money, but the lawn ........... as soon as we've had a bit of rain it'll all green up again - I remember the Great Drought of 1976 - lawns soon perked up when the rains came.

    Don't cut, don't feed, don't water .............. go to the beach instead ............ your lawn will be fine image


    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 87,836

    Good morning Adam image

    We've been having steady rain for the past 3 hours or so - my lawns are breathing collective sighs of relief - I hope yours are too - they'll soon be green again image


    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • FleurisaFleurisa Posts: 779

    Use your washing up water

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 87,836

    My washing up water would provide enough to adequately soak about 1.5 sq metres of lawn a day.  Far better to use it on the shrubs.

     A little water on the lawn is worse than no water at all because it encourages the roots to the surface where they become scorched.  Far better for the roots to continue to search downwards.  It really doesn't damage a lawn long term for it to go without water for at least two or three weeks as long as it's not been scalped by mowing too short image

     


    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • Thats brilliant thank you. I didn't know that about the roots so that's very useful. I was planning to use Nematodes on the 20 or so ant hills that have popped so I'll make sure any watering is done on a rainy week or make sure I properly soak it to penetrate past the roots

  • I'm considering green emulsion...

  • nutcutletnutcutlet Posts: 27,414

    Good idea Steveimage But choose the colour carefully

    A neighbour of my mother had a concrete front garden with a flowerbed in it. He painted the concrete green but it wasn't a very grass-like green.

     



    In the sticks near Peterborough
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 87,836
    Adam Knights wrote (see)

    Thats brilliant thank you. I didn't know that about the roots so that's very useful. I was planning to use Nematodes on the 20 or so ant hills that have popped so I'll make sure any watering is done on a rainy week or make sure I properly soak it to penetrate past the roots

    That's absolutely right image


    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • We're on a private water supply and I'm very conscious of the necessity to consider that water is a finite and valuable resource.... even if you are on mains.

    I never ever water anything other than newly planted plants.  Then I use collected brown water.

    If my lawn goes brown I don't care.  It will green up if and when it rains again and I can quick throw some seed on it if that's needed.

    I'm south facing in an area with low rainfall but very cold night temperatures so we tend always to have heavy dew in the summer.

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